Great site to check out
http://christchurchcitylibraries.com/heritage/warsandconflicts/worldwar1/nurses/

http://www.digitalnz.org/user_sets/537a9ce1fb002c758b00002c




To cite this page:
WW1 New Zealand soldiers and nurses on a ship at Durban, South Africa.pic-vn3356332-v
Source from the National Library of Australia

MOST FANTASTIC SLIDE SHOW OF NZ NURSES AT WORK IN WW1:
http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/interactive/nurses-hospital-and-health

Tending to the wounded on or near the battlefield was a huge job, and it was done under the most difficult conditions. As the images in this slide show illustrate, New Zealand’s medical services were well organised and included surgeons, anaesthetists, nurses and a fully equipped dental hospital. The captions are those used in the original scrapbook from which these images are taken.

AN ARTICLE ABOUT A SHORTAGE OF NURSES AT THE FRONT LINE IN WW1:

http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&cl=search&d=EP19150615.2.92

NURSES DYING ON BOARD SHIP:

external image hmts-marquette-event.jpg?itok=hPDF2lAS====Keyword tags====

1915 Ten NZ nurses lost in Marquette sinking

The sinking of the transport ship Marquette in the Aegean Sea in late 1915 added to the grief of a nation still reeling from the heavy losses at Gallipoli. Among the fatalities were 32 New Zealanders, including 10 nurses – making 23 October the deadliest day in the history of this country’s military nursing.
The Marquette had been built as a cargo ship in 1898 under another name but had been converted into a troop transport during the war. It was not, as some allege, a hospital ship. Instead, it was a grey-painted transport, and as such was fair game for the German submarine U-35. Of the 741 people crowded on board, 167 were lost, including ten members of the New Zealand Army Nursing Service, 19 male Medical Corps staff (part of the New Zealand No. 1 Stationary Hospital) and three New Zealand soldiers.
  • The Marquette sank as if she had been a tiny cockle shell, and so quietly. There was no explosion …
  • Edith Popplewell
The Kiwis need not have died. A marked hospital ship, by definition safe from attack, had left the same port on the same day as the Marquette, completely empty. By putting the medical staff in an unmarked transport in a convoy carrying troops and ammunition, the authorities unnecessarily risked their lives. The New Zealand government acknowledged as much in November 1915 when the Governor, Lord Liverpool, told the War Office that his ministers wanted future transfers of medical units to be done by hospital ships where possible.
The sinking caused great public outrage. The death of the nurses was felt particularly badly in the South Island, where the majority of them had lived or nursed. Several are commemorated there. The most elaborate tribute is the Nurses’ Memorial Chapel in front of Christchurch Women’s Hospital, which survived the earthquakes of 2010–11.
Image: The transport ship //Marquette//

Internal links

The transport //Marquette//First World War timelineNZEF involvement - the Salonika campaign1st New Zealand Stationary HospitalChristchurch nurses' memorial chapel

External links


How to cite this page: 'Ten NZ nurses lost in Marquette sinking', URL: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/page/troopship-marquette-sunk-killing-32-nz-medical-staff, (Ministry for Culture and Heritage), updated 17-Oct-2013

NEW ZEALAND WOMEN AT HOME ARE SUFFERING AS A RESULT OF WW1
http://www.digitalnz.org/records/4684244?search%5Btext%5D=WW1+AND+NZ+WOMEN
NZ women are suffering because of the war..jpg
WOMEN SUFFERING BACK HOME


NEW ZEALAND WOMEN KNITTING AND WEAVING FOR THE SOLDIERS OF THE EXPEDITIONARY FORCE BECAUSE THE ENGLISH QUEEN MARY ASKED THEM TO.:
http://www.digitalnz.org/records/17671058?search%5Bpage%5D=2&search%5Btext%5D=WW1+AND+NZ+WOMEN
NZ WOMEN KNITTING AND WEAVING FOR THE NZ SOLDIERS EXPEDITIONARY FORCE.jpg


MORE KNITTING FOR THE BRITISH EMPIRE SOLDIERS:
http://www.digitalnz.org/records/41945?search%5Bpage%5D=3&search%5Btext%5D=WW1+AND+NZ+WOMEN

KNITTING FOR THE BRITISH EMPIRE.jpg
A Knitting pattern book for women


WOMEN FUNDRAISING FOR WW1:
http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/womens-fundraising


Members of the Otago Women's Patriotic Association. Patriotic means feeling very loyal towards a country and a cause: in this case supporting NZ soldiers in WW1
Members of the Otago Women's Patriotic Association. Patriotic means feeling very loyal towards a country and a cause: in this case supporting NZ soldiers in WW1


Members of the Otago Women’s Patriotic Association are photographed at one of their many fund-raising events for Belgium.

An appeal to the women of New Zealand

  • At this moment of our Empire’s needs I appeal to the women of New Zealand to assist me in trying to provide any necessaries which may be required for … the citizen army … My suggestion would be to start a fund in every centre under a small committee of ladies.
Annette, Lady Liverpool (whose husband was New Zealand’s governor), made this plea just one day after the outbreak of war in August 1914. She urged women to provide useful items for soldiers: shirts, underclothing, socks and darning kits (known as housewives).
Women across the country immediately took up her call. The next day, a ‘little band’ of Wellington women had made 250 housewives, sewing into them ‘all sorts of hopes and fears’, according to the Evening Post. Within days, over 800 women attended a public meeting in Dunedin – the largest in the city to that date – to form the Otago and Southland Women’s Patriotic Association.
More than 900 women’s patriotic organisations operated during the war. Women made a huge contribution to New Zealand’s war effort through these groups, and they took a lead role in supplying material to people in war-torn Belgium and France. By the end of the war, women’s groups had raised nearly £5 million.
Knitting for Empire cover
Knitting for Empire cover

Knitting for Empire
Patriotic work was important for the women as well. ‘When this awful war broke out we women all felt that we must do something,’ said Lavinia Kelsey of the Otago and Southland Women’s Patriotic Association. Women not in paid employment kept themselves busy by making clothes for Belgian children, knitting socks for New Zealand soldiers or raising money through garden fêtes and market stalls. Work like this also gave women who were lonely and anxious about what was happening overseas a sense of being close to husbands, lovers, brothers and sons on the other side of the world.

Home comforts

Many women’s organisations were small working bees – groups gathering to knit or stitch items of clothing for soldiers. Women took it upon themselves to provide the comforts that soldiers needed in their kit bags: two pairs each of socks and underpants, two each of woollen shirts and undershirts, towels and cholera belts, and one handkerchief, chest protector, pair of braces, holdall, balaclava cap, service bag for rations, and a housewife. Other groups supplied hospitals in New Zealand with clothing for returned soldiers.
Some women focused their efforts on helping particular groups affected by the war or groups of soldiers. Lady Liverpool’s and Mrs Pomare’s Maori Soldiers' Fund provided items to Maori men serving in Gallipoli, France and Belgium. Taranaki women formed the Eltham Belgian Sewing Guild to provide clothing to women, children and the homeless in Belgium. The Dominion Stocking League sent old socks and stockings to a local hospital for sterilisation, then converted them into clothes for Belgian and British children. These women placed a penny in the pocket of every garment they made.
In 1916 women’s patriotic committees formed the Dominion Parcels Scheme. Until the end of the war, the scheme sent parcels to soldiers overseas at the rate of 24,000 per month. Some women’s groups met daily to manage the demands of filling parcels with tobacco, tinned food and hand-made woollens such as socks.




http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/xmas-day-goodies-care-of-the-nz-ymca
Christmas Day goodies for the soldiers from the YMCA.jpg


BRITISH WOMEN ARE BEING ASKED TO DO DIFFERENT WORK BECAUSE THE SOLDIERS ARE AWAY. THIS ARTICLE TALKS ABOUT NZ WOMEN:

The Thames Star. THURSDAY, MARCH 1, 1917. WOMEN AND THE WAR

Thames Star, Volume LVIII, Issue 10331, 1 March 1917, Page 4







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