MAORI BATTALION in GALLIPOLI 1915 - the Roll of Honour this information has come from the website:

http://www.familytreecircles.com/maori-battalion-in-gallipoli-1915-the-roll-of-honour-17229.html
he following is a list of casualties in the Maori Contingent on Gallipoli in 1915
It is of those Killed in action or those who died of Wounds or Disease obtained whilst on active service.

A HIGHLIGHTED NAME INDICATES A LINK TO A PHOTO


Aramataku, Herewini - Private 16/87

B Company, 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action - 6 August 1915

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Son of Hamiora & Kakahuwai Aramakutu of Te Araroa, East Coast, Gisborne, New Zealand

Brother of Mrs Anderson of Omaio, Bay of Plenty, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Omaio, Bay of Plenty, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Baker, Whare - Private 16/524

B Company, 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action - 21 August 1915

Memorial - Hill 60 (NZ) Memorial, Hill 60 Cemetery, Turkey

Next of Kin - Jack Baker, Waipiro Bay, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Waipiro Bay, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Carroll, Tuahae - Corporal 16/572

New Zealand Maori Contingent

Killed in action 10th December 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Buried - Embarkation Pier Cemetery Special Memorial A. 46.

Son of Mo Pohatu, Gisborne, Poverty Bay, NZ

Husband of the late Peti Ngakaho.

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Gisborne, New Zealand

MEDALS


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion.



Christie, Hapi - Private 16/567

B Company, 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Disease 17th February 1916, UK, ex-Gallipoli

Buried - Melcombe Regis Cemetery, Dorset, England III. C. 2670

Next of Kin - Mr William Christie, Te Karaka, Waikohu County, Gisborne, Poverty Bay, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Te Karaka, Waikohu County, Gisborne, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Ferris, Donald - Private 16/519

B Company, 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action - 8th August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Buried - Embarkation Pier Cemetery Special Memorial B. 16.

Son of Mr C. W. Ferris, Gisborne, Poverty Bay, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Gisborne, Poverty Bay, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Geary, John - Lance Corporal 16/36A (& listed as 9/36)

Otago Mounted Rifles, Main Body (drafted as NZ Maori Contingent)

Killed in action 8th August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Son of Mr W. Geary, Portobello, Dunedin, Otago, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Portobello Camp, (old Mental Hospital), Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion



Harding, Joseph - Private 16/267

A Company, 1st Maori Contingent

Died of wounds in Egypt ex-Gallipoli 14 August 1915

Buried - Alexandria Chatby Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt refernce #J. 88.

Son of Mr Charles Harding, Hokitika, Westland, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Bluff, Southland, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion



**Hare,** Heremaia- Private 16/370

A Company, 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 7th August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Son of Hariatu Maru & the late Hare Wi, Te Kao, Mangonui County, Northland, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Te Kao, Mangonui County, Northland, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Herewini,** Hohepa - Private 16/176

1st Maori Contingent B Company

Died of wounds, Gallipoli age 21 on 21st Septembr 1915

Buried - Walker's Ridge Cemetery, Anzac, Turkey II.B.4.

Memorial - Rotorua War Memorial (WWI)

Son of Ruahiuhiu Herewini, Ngapuna, Rotorua, New Zealand

ENLSITMENT ADDRESS: Ngapuna, Rotorua, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Hetaraka, Harae - Private 16/325

A Company, 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Disease age 20 in Mudros, ex-Gallipoli 16 Aug 1915

Buried - East Mudros Military Cemetery, Lemnos, Greece II. F. 91.

Son of Timoti & Wanakia Hetaraka, Peria, Mangonui County, Northland, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Peria, Mangonui County, Northland, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Hill, Percy,- Warrant Officer 2nd Class, Company Sergeant Major 16/4537A

MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES in connection with operations described in General Sir Ian Hamilton's despatch dated 11th December 1915.

New Zealand Maori Contingent Maori Pioneer Battalion

Killed in action 9th August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Husband of Annie Eleanor Hill, 39 Melville Road, Stonebridge, London

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS:

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Hovell,** George Woodward - Private 16/556

A Company, 1st Maori Contingent (Pioneer Battalion)

Died of Wounds age 16 in UK, ex-Gallipoli, 20th October 1915

Buried - Nunhead All Saints Cemetery, London, 52. 33511 D.

Son of Charles & Mary Hovell, Kennedy's Road, Coromandel, Firth of Thames, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Coromandel, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Karetai, Stewart - Private 16/271

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 21st August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Hill 60 (NZ) Memorial, Hill 60 Cemetery, Turkey Panel 12

Son of Joseph & Elizabeth Karetai c/o Otakou Post Office, Otakou, Dunedin

- Brother Sydney George Karetai - Private 16/585 also left on same ship with same contingent

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Otakou, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Mangaroa,** Ngare William Pte 16/400

A Company, 1st Maori Contingent (Pioneer Battalion)

Died of disease following wounds in Malta ex-Gallipoli 30th December 1915

Buried - Pieta Military Cemetery, Malta C. IV. 2

Brother of Thompson Mangaroa, Taumarunui, NZ - Private 25556 - who died of disease in France 9th June 1919

Brother of Miss Kuhu Mangaroa of Kakahi

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Kakahi, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Manihera,** Waitere - Private 16/189

A Company 1st Maori Contingent (Pioneer Battalion)

Killed in action age 23 6th August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Son of Mrs Elizabeth Manihera, Rapaki, Mount Herbert County, Lyttelton, Canterbury, NZ

Also son of Enerura and Makareta Manihera of Rapaki, Lyttelton

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Rapaki, Mount Herbert County, Lyttelton,

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Manuel,** Richard - Lance Corporal 16/340

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 8th August 1915

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Son of Walter Manuel, Te Kao, North Auckland, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Te Kao, Auckland, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Maraki,** Tautuhi - Private 16/117

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 9th August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Son of Maraki Tautuhi, Waipiro Bay, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Akuaku, Waipiro Bay, East Cape, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Marino, Hohepa - Private16/139

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of wounds Gallipoli 2nd September 1915

Burial - Embarkation Pier Cemetery Special Memorial C. 14.

Son of Hura Marino, Tolaga Bay, Gisborne, Poverty Bay, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Mamaku, Rotorua, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Mete Kingi, Teira Hoani - Corporal 16/383

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action age 28 on 8th August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

- Son of a well-known Wanganui Chief, Hoani Mete Kingi & Peeke Mete Kingi, Putiki, Wanganui, NZ

- Grandson of Mete Kingi Paetahi, the First Maori member elected to the House of Representatives.

- Brother of Henare Nemare Mete Kingi - Private 16/385 who was killed in action Somme, France 14th September 1916

- Brother of Paki Hoani Mete Kingi - Quartermaster-Sergeant 16/403

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Wanganui, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Mira, William - Private 16/278

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Disease in Egypt ex-Gallipoli, 9th December 1915

Buried - Cairo War Memorial Cemetery D. 304.

Son of Henry Mutu Mira, Otaki, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Otaki, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Ngamu, Hoani - Private 16/185

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 6th August 1915

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Memorial - Rotorua War Memorial (World War 1)

Next of Kin: Tamihana Tikitere & Turiata Hopaea, Pukehinau, Ohinepanea, Tauranga, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Pukehinau, Akitio, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Paku,** Akuhata - Private 16/28

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 21st August 1915 in the first assault on Hill 60.

Memorial - Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial 12.1.3.

Son of Mrs Heni Tamihana, of Wairoa, Napier

Next of Kin: Mrs Whare Carroll, c/o Lady Carroll, Gisborne, NZ ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Gisborne, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Paora, Paetaha - Private 16/201

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Disease Malta ex-Gallipoli, 4th February 1916

Buried - Pieta Military Cemetery Malta, C. VII. 6.

Son of Mr & Mrs Kohatu Paora, of Taupo, NZ

ENLSITMENT ADDRESS: Taupo, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Papuni, Kurei - Private 16/493

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 6th August 1915 during the August Offensive in a night attack on Bauchop's Hill (Stowers).

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Son of Mrs Tapeka Papuni, Omarumutu, Opotiki, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Omarumutu, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Para, Paul Whetu - Private 16/346

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Wounds in Kaikohe, NZ, ex-Gallipoli on 9th May 1916.

- On September 7th 1915, he was admitted to No.15 General Hospital in Alexandria, Egypt with a severe gunshot wound in the left hip.

Buried - Kaikohe Maori Cemetery, Northland, New Zealand

Son of Mr & Mrs Whetu Para, Okahau, Northland, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Kaikohe, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Peneamene, Tumaru - Private 16/284

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Disease in UK ex-Gallipoli 18th September 1915

Buried - Birmingham Lodge Hill Cemetery, Warwickshire, England B10. 608.

Son of Hohepa & the late Maaka Peneamene, Morven, Canterbury, NZ

Brother of Tieke Peneamene - Private 16/283 also served Gallipoli

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Morven, Canterbury, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Popoki, Te Ao - Private 16/410

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Disease in Egypt 15th August 1915

Buried - Alexandria (Chatby) Military and War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt L. 4

Son of Kurupai Popoki, Puketarata, Otorohanga, New Zealand

ENLSITMENT ADDRESS: Mokai, Taupo, New Zealand


**Porete,** August Paani - Private 16/287

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Enteric Fever age 22 in Egypt having been evacuated from Gallipoli on 11th September 1915

Buried - Alexandria Chatby Military and War Memorial Cemetery D. 192

Son of Son of Pani and Timaima Porete of Hillgrove, Otago

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Hillgrove, Waitaki, Otago, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Potonga, Tame - Private 16/388

A Company 1st Maori Contingent Pioneer Battalion

Died of Disease in NZ 30th December 1915

Buried - Pakaraka Maori Cemetery, Wanganui, NZ

Son of the late Kaiaoha Potonga

- Born at Waitotara

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Waitotara, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Pulu,** Niuloa - Sergeant 16/1107

Rarotongans, Attached B Company 3rd Maori Contingent

LAST UNIT SERVED: New Zealand (Maori) Pioneer Battalion

Died of Pneumonia age 32 (was incorrectly recorded as dying of wounds) at sea on board HT Corinthic en route to Capetown 26th June 1916 - click link for more story -

Memorial - Wellington Provincial Memorial, Wellington, NZ

Husband of Vaiata, Alofi, Niue Island

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: unknown


**Rapihana,** Herewini - Private 16/580

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 6th August 1915 age 20 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Son of Wiremu & Maki Rapihana, Pukepoto, Mangonui, Doubtless Bay, Northland, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Pukepoto, Mangonui, Doubtless Bay,

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Ratima, Nepia - Private 16/91

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 7th August 1915

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Son of Wharekohuru Remana, Poroporo, Whakatane, NZ

Brother of Romana Ratima 16/94

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Torere, Opotiki, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Richmond,** Tom - Private 16/102

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Wounds in Egypt, ex-Gallipoli 9th September 1915

Buried - Alexandria Chatby Military and War Memorial Cemetery H. 24.

Son of T. Rihimona Rehua, & Teoria Rihimona, Torere, Opotiki, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Torere, Opotiki, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Ropata,** Pahia - Private 16/199

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 6t August 1915

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

- Son of Tangaho Ropata and Metapere Ropata, of Otaki, Manawatu Line, Wellington

- Husband of Pearle Hunt (formerly Ropata), of Little River, Christchurch

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS; Little River, Christchurch, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Rukingi, Waretini - Sergeant 16/62

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 1st September 1915

Buried - Embarkation Pier Cemetery Special Memorial C. 80

Memorial at Rotorua War Memorial (World War 1)

- Son of Rotohiki and Pinenga Rukingi, of Ohinemutu, Rotorua.

- Brother of 16/578 Private Henare Rukingi, A Company 1st Maori Contingent, same departure as Waretini ..

- Brother of 16/1369 Corporal Pini Rukingi, Maori Contingent, 4th Reinforcements to Egypt

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Waerengaahika, Gisborne, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Sidney, William - Private 16/591

A Company 1st Maori Contingent Pioneer Battalion

Killed in action 21st August 1915

Memorial - Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial 12.1.4.

Son of Mrs W Sidney of Tologa Bay, Gisborne

Next of Kin: Tuahine Haereone Sidney, Tolaga Bay, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Tolaga Bay, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Simpson, George - Private 16/506

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 21st August 1915

Memorial - Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial 12.1.5.

Next of Kin: Brother, J. B. Simpson, Whakatane, Bay of Plenty, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Weka, Auckland, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Taewa, Rawiri - Private 16/68

B Company, 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 21st August 1915

Memorial - Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial 12.1.6.

Next of Kin: Mr Eruiti Kopa Taewa (brother), Tuparoa, Waiapu County, Gisborne, Poverty Bay, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Tuparoa, Waiapu, Gisborne, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Tahu,** Ngakepa - Private 16/358

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 6th August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Son of Taimona and Ruta Tahu of Te Kopuru, Wairoa North.

- Native of Ripia, Northland

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Ripia, Northern Wairoa, Dargaville, Northland, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Taka, William - Private 16/474

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 6th August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Son of Mr and Mrs Wiremu Taka, of Mercer, Waikato, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Mercer, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Tamarapa, Waikohari - 16/418

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Dsease in Mudros ex-Gallipoli 12th October 1915

Buried - Portianos Military Cemetery Lemnos, Greece V. B. 111.

Son of Mr Tamarapa, Ohangi, Hawera County, Taranaki, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Ohangi, Hawera County, Taranaki, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion



**Taumaunu,** Hare - Private 16/78

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Disease in Mudros ex-Gallipoli 11th October 1915

Buried - Portianos Military Cemetery Lemnos, Greece V. B. 105.

Son of Hapi Taumaunu, Reporua, Port Awanui, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Reporua, Port Awanui, Gisborne, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Te Moni,** Matehaere - Private 16/181

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 6th August 1915

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Next of Kin: Mr Makete Te Moni (brother), Te Puke, Tauranga County, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Te Puke, BayNew Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Te Otimi,** Pitonga - Private 16/183

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 8th August 1915

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Memorial - Rotorua War Memorial (World War 1)

Son of Marupo & Ami Marupo Te Otimi, Maketu, Tauranga County, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Whakatane, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Te Whare,** Taiawhiao - Private 16/421

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Wounds Malta ex-Gallipoli 31st July 1915

Buried - Addolorata Cemetery, Malta E. EA. A. 656

Son of Mrs Miriama te Whare, Taupo, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Taupo, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Thompson, Richard - Private 16/360A

Otago Mounted Rifles Maori Contingent

Died of wounds at sea, ex-Gallipoli, on board H.S. Davanha 9th August 1915

Memorial - Lone Pine Memorial Anzac, Turkey 76

Son of Pono & Annie Thompson

Next of Kin: Rua Thompson, Otakou, Waianawa, Southland, NZ

- Native of Otakou, Dunedin, New Zealand.

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Ruapuke Island, Foveaux Strait, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Tiini, Hopa - Private 16/364

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Disease in Egypt 16th January 1916

Buried - ?

Son of Tiini Heta (father), Peria, North Auckland, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Peria, North Auckland, New Zealand


Tua, James - Private 16/480

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Wounds at sea ex-Gallipoli 14th August 1915

Memorial - Lone Pine Memorial 76

Son of Mrs Areta Tuatini, Hangatiki, Waitomo County, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Hangatiki, Waitomo County, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


**Tuati,** Pareiha _ Private 16/123

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of WOunds at sea ex-Gallipoli 16th August 1915

Buried - Portianos Military Cemetery Lemnos, Greece I. B. 32.

Son of Mrs Emere Tuati, Thames, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Whakatane, Bay of Plenty, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Tunoa, Hamiora - Private 16/125

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 21st August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial 12.1.7.

Son of Tunoa Lawson (father), Whakatane, NZ

Next of Kin: Tu Mihaera & Kauha Lawson, Whakatane, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Whakatane, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Wahia, Moa - Private 16/482

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Disease at sea, ex-Gallipoli 9th September 1915

Buried - Alexandria Chatby Military & War Memorial Cemetery H. 25.

Son of Ani Ngarae, Matakana, Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Thames, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Wahia, Thomas - Private 16/426

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 6th August 1915

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Son of Mrs Wahia Te Moananui, Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, NZ

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Tauranga, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Wairau, Ra - Private 16/53

Died of Wounds Malta ex-Gallipoli 11 Sep 1915

Buried - Pieta Military Cemetery B. X. 4.

- Son of Ra and Wahati Wairau, of Opoutama, Hawkes Bay.

- Next of Kin: Miss Wahati Wairau (sister), Mahia, Wairoa County, Hawke's Bay, NZ

- Brother of 16/779 Private Raniera Wairau, died of disease 30th October 1916 en route to England from France.

- Brother of Paihau, of Opoutama, Hawkes Bay,

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Muriwai, Cook County, Gisborne, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Waiti, Hauraki - Private 16/549

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 21st August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial 12.1.8.

Son of Mrs Apikara Mangaone, Hiruharama (Waitakaro), Waipiro Bay, Waiapu County, Gisborne, Poverty Bay, New Zealand

Memorial - Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial 12.1.8.

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Hiruharama (Waitakaro), Waiapu County, Gisborne, Poverty Bay, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion



Warakihi, Poihipi - Prvate 16/564

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Killed in action 21st August 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Hill 60 New Zealand Memorial 12.1.9.

Next of Kin: Ruku Warakihi, Ormond, Gisborne, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Gisborne, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Whareraupo, Tuakana-Kore - Lance Corporal 16/145

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of wounds, Gallipoli 6 Aug 1915 Gallipoli, Turkey

Memorial - Chunuk Bair New Zealand Memorial 24

Memorial - Rotorua War Memorial (World War 1

Son of Mrs. Te Whareraupo, of Te Waite, Rotoiti, Rotorua

Next of Kin: T. Whareraupo, Rotoiti, Rotorua, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Rotorua, New Zealand

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Whitau, Puaka - Private 16/188

A Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Disease in UK, ex-Gallipoli 10 Oct 1915

Buried - Wokingham Saint Sebastian Churchyard, Berkshire, England Special Plot 1

Son of

Next of Kin: Mrs Miria Kemara (aunt), Temuka, NZ

- Brother of 16/789 Private Arapata Koti P. Whitau, 2nd Maori Contingent, who was killed in action Somme, France, 8th June 1916

- Brother of 16/231 Private Tuapaoa Whitau A Company 1st Maori Contingent

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Tuahiwi, Kaiapoi, Canterbury, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion


Williams, Joe - Private 16/112

B Company 1st Maori Contingent

Died of Dysentry at sea, ex-Gallipoli 13th August 1915

Memorial - Lone Pine Memorial 76

Net of Kin: Wiremu Rori, Hokianga, New Zealand

ENLISTMENT ADDRESS: Tuparoa, Waiapu County, Northland, NZ

MEDALS:


  • 1914-1915 Star

  • British War Medal

  • Victory Medal

  • Gallipoli Medallion
>> Sign up now to browse ad-free!Surnames: ARAMATAKU GEARY HARE HETERAKA KARETAI MANIHERA MARAKI METEKINGINGAMU PENEAMENE PORETE POTONGA RAPIHANA RATANA ROPATA RUHUNGA TAHUTAUMAUNU TEMONI.TEWHARE TIINI TUATI TUNOA WAIRAU WAITI WARAKIHI WHARERANPOWHITAU

The Maori Pioneer Battalion sung this version of the famous WW1 marching song when they were fighting in France in 1916-1918.

  • || It's a long way to Tipperary,
  • It's a long way to go;
  • It's a long way to Tipperary,
  • To the sweetest girl I know;

  • Goodbye Piccadilly,
  • Farewell Leicester Square,
  • It's a long, long way to Tipperary,
  • But my heart's right there. || || He roa te wä ki Tipirere
  • He tino mamao
  • He roa te wä ki Tipirere
  • Ki täku kötiro

  • Kupai Pakitiri
  • Hai konä Rehita Koea
  • He tino mamao ki Tipirere
  • Ki taku tau pümau || || (It's) a long way to Tipperary
  • (It's) very far away
  • (It's) a long way to Tipperary
  • To my girl.

  • Goodbye Piccadilly,
  • Farewell Leicester Square,
  • It's very far away to Tipperary,
  • To my one true love ||


  • This was submitted in 2005 by a contributor who learnt it from his grandmother. Her father fought in WWI, and her mother was Irish. Tipperary is a town in Ireland, so there is a lot of family history preserved in this song. Kupai is a transliteration, and reminds us of Ka pai. And Hai kona is an old Ngati Porou pronunciation of Hei kona.
This living version of the song was sent to me after I put a 1914 translation (possibly by Apirana Ngata) on this web site.
external image tipirere_postcard.jpg
Postcards like this one (in the National Library of NZ) were presented to members of the 2nd Maori Contingent of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force after they marched through the streets of Wellington on Saturday 16 Sept 1915. (Papers Past: Evening Standard 20 Sept, 1915)
  • NZMEC (New Zealand Maori Expeditionary Contingent?) is not an official army title, but is probably an error by the illustrator who has also drawn the taiaha upside down and too short.
He roa te wä ki Tipirere
  • He tino mamao
  • He roa te wä ki Tipirere
  • Ki täku kötiro
  • E noho Pakitiri

  • Hei konä Rehita Koea

  • He mamao rawa Tipirere

  • Ka tae ahau

(It's) a long way to Tipperary

  • (It's) very far away

  • (It's) a long way to Tipperary

  • To my girl.
  • Stay there Piccadilly,

  • Farewell Leicester Square,

  • It's very far away, Tipperary,

  • But it touches my feelings.

.

Note how the words I have marked in red in the 1915 translation have been improved in the Ngati Porou variant, giving much more feeling to the last two lines"He tino mamao ki Tipirere, ki taku tau pümau."

It's a Long Way to Tipperary


  • Written by Jack Judge, a London music-hall entertainer in 1912. This song was adopted by the British Army's 7th Battalion of the Connaught Rangers Regiment. They were mostly Irishmen, and the regiment had connections with Tipperary Town in Ireland.At the start of 'The Great War' in August 1914, they took the song with them to France where it became "the marching anthem of the battlefields of Europe." It is still known and sung today. FULL DETAILS
  • Listen to the Tipperary tune from a phonograph cylinder played on a hand-cranked 1918 victrola REAL AUDIO

Other Maori songs of the overseas wars

  • Pokarekare Ana: popular with Maori solders in 1915-17 preparing to go to WWI.
I Runga o nga Piki: sung in Sept 1915 to farewell the Second Maori Contingent
Te Ope Tuatahi: 1916 recruiting song by Ngata and Tomoana.
Hoea Ra Te Waka Nei: a heart-breaking cry for financial support for the men in the trenches in France in 1917.
E Pari Ra: 1918 tangi for Maori solders lost in battle during WWI.
Ho---ki, Hoki To---nu Mai: a bereaved young wife's 1918 lament before it was given a jazzed-up poi tune
Karangatia Rä: sung to returning men of the Maori Battalion after WWI.


Te Hokowhitu a Tu

    • Te Hokowhitu a Tu ('The seventy twice-told warriors of the war god'), was so named because 140 was the favoured size of a traditional war party or taua.The 1st Maori contingent, "Te Hokowhitu a Tu," sailed from New Zealand in February, 1915 and fought as combat engineers and snipers inGallipoli, (Marching in, 477 men; marching out, 134).
    • There were other Maori at Gallipoli as well, who had gone along with their Pakeha mates in 1914 to enlist in the Hauraki, Taranaki, Auckland and Wellington regiments.
    • After evacuating from Gallipoli, the surviving fit men of the Maori contingent were combined with the survivors of the Otago Mounted Rifles to form the NZ Pioneer Battalion, which went to France. This was their marching song:
    • || Ko koe Nui Tireni,
    • Te kuini o te ao
    • Arohaina nei e au,
    • Ko koe tangihia
    • Ko koe e mihia
    • Ko koe te kianga pai,
    • Te au taku moe
    • Te aroha kia koe,
    • I te roa o te ra.

    • Chorus: x2
    • Ka whai mai ra te aroha
    • A huri noa te ao. ||
    • In May 1916, they fought at Armentieres, digging trenches and going on raiding parties (in one raid, armed with mere). And in August 1916 they went to the Somme, where they dug what became the famous communication trenches 'Turk Lane' and 'Fish Alley' ( or French Lane) PHOTOS. It was dangerous work. On one day they lost 12 killed and 40 wounded.Their doggedness and competence when constructing these communication trenches earned them the name of "The Diggers." This name spread to all NZers and then to the Australians ("G'day Dig"). This is ironic, as the Australians had a reputation for being not keen to use a pick and shovel.external image Te_hoko_flag.jpg
    • By August 1917, enough Maori reinforcements had arrived to make a complete NZ (Maori) Pioneer Battalion of 928 men. They built combat trenches through the swamps of Passchendale and the YpresSalient.
    • At the end of the war in November 1918, the colours of the Maori Pioneer Battalion replaced the German Imperial Eagle over the captured town of Le Quesnoy.
    • 2,227 Mäori and 458 Pacific Islanders fought during WW1, 336 died on active service and 734 were wounded.
    • The above is a brief summary from Chris Pugsley's excellent book Te Hokowhitu a Tu: The Maori Pioneer Battalion in the First World War. This book also contains a complete list of all who were in the Battalion, and the names and addresses of next-of-kin. It may help those compiling family histories and whakapapa.
    • ___ ---- ------------ ---------------- -------------------


The information directly below has come from:


THE MAORIS IN THE GREAT WAR

CHAPTER II. — RECRUITING AND ORGANISATION OF THE MAORI CONTINGENT


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CHAPTER II.


RECRUITING AND ORGANISATION OF THE MAORI CONTINGENT.

PAGE 9The first proposal to send a Maori force to the War was made in the beginning of August, 1914. The news of the proclamation of war between Britain and her Allies and Germany aroused the kaingas from the far North to the Wai-Pounamu, and telegrams to the Government offering Maori assistance to the Empire came pouring in from all parts of the country. The Arawa of Rotorua and the Ngati-Kahungunu of Te Wairoa and other parts of Hawke's Bay were the first to volunteer, followed quickly byNgati-Porou, by the tribes around Gisborne and by Whanganui and Ngati-Apa. The first reply of the authorities was to the purport that the rule of the Imperial Government had been that no native race should be used in hostilities between European races. It was soon announced in the cablegrams, however, that Indian troops were being sent to France and also that native soldiers from Africa were to assist the French. On learning of this the Maori tribes, through their members of Parliament, renewed their request to be permitted to serve the King in the field of battle. The Prime Minister replied, expressing his great pleasure and gratitude at the offers of the loyal Maoris and stating that he would place the proposal before the Imperial Government. On September 16th he announced that His Majesty's Government had accepted the Maoris' aid and had agreed that a Native Contingent of 200 men should be sent to Egypt. A little later this suggestion was altered. The War Office proposed that there should be two Maori forces, each of 250, one to go to Egypt and the other to Samoa.
The principle of Maori participation in the War having thus been established, to the great satisfaction and pride of the people, the next step was the selection of the war-parties. On the suggestion of the Hon. the Minister for Defence, the Maori members of Parliament set about the work of raising the necessary men. On September 18th a meeting of members was held in the room of the Hon. Sir Maui Pomare (then Dr.PAGE 10Pomare; his knighthood was conferred upon him in recognition of his patriotic services in the organisation of the Maori forces, and his work for the welfare of the race). A recruiting Committee was formed, consisting of the Hon. Sir James Carroll, Sir Maui Pomare (Western Maori), the Hon.A. T. Ngata (Eastern Maori), Dr. Peter H. Buck, whose Maori name is Te Rangihiroa (Northern Maori), and Mr Taare Parata (Southern Maori). This committee at once began its task of allotting the proportions of the Contingent of 500 thus: Tai Tokerau (Northern District) 100 men; Tai Hauauru (Western Maori) 180; Tai-Rawhiti (East Coast) 180, and the Wai-Pounamu (“Waters of Greenstone”—the South Island) 40. Thenceforth the Maori Committee kept steadily at work throughout the Great War. Two of the original members were replaced by others soon after the war began. Dr. Buck went on active service, and his place as member for the Northern Maori District was taken by Mr Tau Henare; and Mr. Parata died, to the great regret of his colleagues, and was succeeded by Mr. Uru.
The Committee issued through the “Kahiti”—the Maori Gazette—a notice to all the tribes, calling for volunteers between the ages of 21 and 40 years willing to serve the King for the duration of the war. “E te iwi, whitiki! Whiti, whiti e!” the appeal of the “Komiti Whakahaere” concluded. It was the old war-cry of the chiefs when danger threatened: “O tribe, gird up your loins! Rise up, rise up!” And the Maori people rose eagerly at the challenge and appeal. Volunteers came from the remote gumlands of North Auckland, from the farms and forests of the Kaipara, from the shores of the Bay of Islands and the Hauraki, the King Country and Bay of Plenty coast, the lakeside villages of the Arawa, the sheep farms and rich agricultural country of mis-named Poverty Bay and Hawke's Bay; from the shores of the great central Lake Taupo, the terraced banks of the rushing Whanganui and the plains of Manawatu and Wairarapa; then across Cook Strait the call was answered from the little townships and farms of theNgai-Tahu. From Parengarenga, the most northerly harbour in the Dominion, down to the old whaling and sealing stations on the shore of Foveaux Strait, came athletic brown PAGE 11lads, intensely elated at the prospect of fighting shoulder to shoulder with their white fellow-New Zealanders against the common enemy
Those Pakeha New Zealanders who knew the Maori well were delighted to think that he was being given an opportunity to display his fighting qualities after many years of peace. One, an old missionary in Auckland, said: “If they are true sons of their fathers, they will be brave and gallant fighters, they will show courage and resource in battle, and they will treat wounded enemies and women and children with kindness and courtesy. I would not be afraid to trust the Maori in war. He will be truly British.” A veteran of the wars of half a century previously, said: “I could not wish for better fighters and comrades than the Maoris with whom I fought. When they trusted the white man they could be relied on absolutely. As scouts, of course, there was nothing to touch them. The present generation of Maoris will probably make splendid soldiers.” Another old New Zealand colonist, referring to the military traditions of the Maoris, said: “These traditions, stories of great and glorious deeds of warfare, are the best guarantee we have that the Maori, even under the strange and disturbing conditions of modern warfare, will be a soldier of whom the Empire may be proud. All Maoris are intensely loyal to their race and intensely jealous of its reputation, and now that the Maori race is merged in the British Empire, that loyalty and that jealousy are transferred to Britain. The proposal is to send the natives to Egypt to do duty there, and I know that these men will do their duty thoroughly; but if they are sent to the fighting line there will not be a man of them who will shrink from laying down his life for the Empire of which he is a part. I know that these men will welcome any chance to bring new glory to the Maori race, even at the sacrifice of their own lives.”
The Defence Department and the Maori Committee jointly made arrangements for the medical examination of volunteers and their enrolment for service, and the first camp was established in the middle of October, 1914, on the grounds of the racecourse at Avondale, the olden Whau, a few miles west of Auckland city. The first Maori detachments to enter camp PAGE 12were small parties from Mangonui, North Auckland, and from the Auckland district. On October 19th a party of 50 young men arrived from the South Island and 36 from the Hauraki and Ngati-Maniapoto tribe. On the following day 92 recruits came in from the West Coast, representing the tribes of Whanganui, Ngati-Apa, Ngati-Raukawa andNgati-Toa. These young soldiers were quickly followed by ninety composed of Te Arawa, of the Lakes District, Maketu and Matata, Ngai-Awa from Whakatane, Whakatohea from Opotiki, and the Whanau-a-Apanui and kindred tribes as far as Tikirau (East Cape). The famous fighting Ngati-Porou followed; these young men were from the Tai-Rawhiti villages from the East Cape southward toward Gisborne. The Ngati-Kahungunu from Hawke's Bay and some more Ngapuhi from Kaikohe and other Northern districts completed the 500 men in training under canvas at Avondale.
These young Maoris, the pick of the race, gathered from all corners of the Dominion, entered with the utmost eagerness and zest into their soldierly duties under pakeha instructors. All who visited the camp were pleased with the cheerful temper of the men, their great alacrity at all tasks (“fatigue it was their pride,” to quote Kipling's sergeant in “The Men Who Fought at Minden”), and the quickness and intelligence they brought to bear on the work in hand. Their physique was the theme of praise by inspecting military officers. On parade they attracted great admiration for their stature, their muscular development and their alertness and soldierly bearing. On October 24th, Sir James Allen, Minister for Defence, inspected the Opé Maori, and addressing the recruits expressed his great pleasure at the Maori being the first Native race to offer for service abroad, with the exception, of course of the men of India, who were soldiers already. He praised their quickness and pride in soldierly training and said he was sure they would acquit themselves as creditably as their pakeha fellow-soldiers. The Minister made mention, too, of the number of college-bred young Maoris in the Opé, boys from Te Aute, Waerenga-a-Hika Mission School, St. Stephen's (Parnell, Auckland), Hikurangi (Wairarapa), Otaki, and the Three Kings Wesleyan College, Auckland.
PAGE BREAK
Hon. Sir Maui Pomare, C.M.G., M.P., M.D. Member of the Executive Council, Minister for the Cook and other Islands; Chairman of the Maori Recruiting Board and Maori Regimental Committee.
Hon. Sir Maui Pomare, C.M.G., M.P., M.D. Member of the Executive Council, Minister for the Cook and other Islands; Chairman of the Maori Recruiting Board and Maori Regimental Committee.
Hon. Sir Maui Pomare, C.M.G., M.P., M.D.


Member of the Executive Council, Minister for the Cook and other Islands; Chairman of the Maori Recruiting Board and Maori Regimental Committee.

PAGE BREAK
Hon. Sir James Carroll, M.L.C. (Maori War Medal) Member of the Maori Recruiting Board and Maori Regimental Committee. (Died at Auckland, October 18th, 1926.)
Hon. Sir James Carroll, M.L.C. (Maori War Medal) Member of the Maori Recruiting Board and Maori Regimental Committee. (Died at Auckland, October 18th, 1926.)
Hon. Sir James Carroll, M.L.C. (Maori War Medal)


Member of the Maori Recruiting Board and Maori Regimental Committee. (Died at Auckland, October 18th, 1926.)

PAGE 13The proposal to send the Maoris away in two companies, one to Samoa and one to Egypt, was debated among the tribes, and was strongly opposed by the principal men. The feeling gathered weight that it would not be judicious to divide the contingent, and the unanimous opinion was soon expressed that the Maori should be sent to Egypt as being near the seat of war. The men naturally were anxious to reach the actual battlefield and were not enthusiastic about garrison duty. Sir Maui Pomareand his committee conveyed to the Prime Minister a general request that the whole of the force should be sent to Egypt, and this request was sent on by the Government to the British Secretary of State for the Colonies. On November 7th a cablegram from London to the Governor stated that the wishes of the Maoris and the New Zealand Government had been acceded to, and that all the Maoris would be despatched to Egypt.
The Contingent was now divided into two companies, A and B, composed as follows:—
A Company (Northern Maori, West Coast—South Island):

  • Platoon (Ropu) 1—Men from the North Auckland district, extending from Tamaki (Auckland isthmus) to the Rerenga-Wairua (Spirits' Leap, in the extreme North).
  • Platoon 2—Tamaki to Pari-ninihi (the White Cliffs, North Taranaki), including Ngati-Maniapoto, also the Hauraki and Tauranga tribes andNgati-Tuwharetoa of Taupo. (These were the tribes of Tainui stock).
  • Platoon 3—West Coast: Waitotara, Whanganui and inland tribes from Taihape to Manawatu.
  • Platoon 4—Horowhenua to Wellington, also the South Island.
B Company (Rotorua and East Coast):
  • Platoon 5—Te Arawa.
  • Platoon 6—Te Awa-a-te-Atua (Matata) to the East Coast and Waiapu.
  • Platoon 7—Uawa (Tolago Bay) and Gisborne.
  • Platoon 8—Ngati-Kahungunu, from Te Mahia to Napier and Wairarapa.
PAGE 14The organisation of the Contingent having been completed, training was carried on steadily in infantry work under Captain Peacock and Permanent Force instructors. Squad, platoon and company drill, route marching, musketry, bayonet practice, assault practice, trench digging, night attacks and all other details of instruction kept the Contingent busy until its departure for the Front.
Several veteran officers with Maori War services were anxious to lead the Contingent, and it was at first proposed that Colonel T. W. Porter, C.B., who had a distinguished record in the New Zealand and South African campaigns, should go in command. No better choice could have been made. Colonel Porter had served continuously in the Maori Wars from 1865 to 1871 as an officer of native forces; he knew the Maori temperament as few pakehas did, and the men would have placed complete confidence in such an experienced and sympathetic leader. However, it was considered that he was too old for further active service. Another veteran extremely anxious to serve was Captain Gilbert Mair, N.Z.C., perhaps the most dashing and enterprising of all our New Zealand-born and bred soldiers. He had won his New Zealand Cross by a most gallant feat of arms, his defeat of Te Kooti near Rotorua in 1870. Mair was the hero of the Arawa; from 1866 to 1872 he had led them on active service. Even in his old age he was the most active of men; at seventy-eight years of age he made a long horseback journey through the rough Urewera country over the old fighting trails, with the present writer. Yet another volunteer was Major J. T. Large, who had served with the Urewera campaigns. Rejected in New Zealand in 1914, he went to Australia and tried unsuccessfully to join the forces there; and by way of demonstrating his fitness for active service, in spite of his age, he undertook a long walking tour through the North of Auckland. But it was the day of the young man; the old warriors were reminded that their place lay in the homeland; and they loyally accepted the position and exerted themselves in recruiting and in lending a helping hand to the fortunate ones chosen for the battlefield of Tu. Colonel Porter, in the latter part of the war, was PAGE 15engaged by the Government to carry out special work, as an Inspector of Recruiting Services, and he also gave useful gratuitous service as Commandant of the New Zealand National Reserve.
Early on February 10th, 1915, the Contingent packed up and bade farewell to the camp and set out on the long trail to the Old World. The Hokowhitu a Tu, “The Seventy Twice-told Warriors of the War God,” the Maori chiefs christened the force, in allusion to the favourite number of a war-party, 140, for a desperate attack in the days of old. Marching through Auckland city, the men went aboard the troop-steamer “Warrimoo,” which sailed for Wellington. On Saturday, February 13th, the Maoris landed at Wellington and with a pakeha contingent paraded in Newtown Park for final review and farewell. An official account of that memorable good-bye parade, published in Maori in the Government “Kahiti,” described the march and the park ceremonials thus: “The Pakeha people who beheld the march of that 500 will never forget the sight, the spectacle of that splendid war-party, those tall strong men, their fine marching—it was equal to the drill and appearance of the best soldiers in the world. There were some who said that the Maori soldiers were the finest body ever seen on parade in Newtown Park. There they bade farewell to their assembled relatives; they displayed their skill in the accomplishments of their ancestors—the haka,the tutu-ngarahu (war-dance), canoe-paddling songs and other chants; excellent their leaping in the war-dance, their drill of hands in unison, their waiata-chanting.”
There were speeches of exhortation and affection from the Maori chiefs, counsel to uphold the warrior fame of the Maori and touching songs of farewell from the native assemblage. The Maori was about to take that long, long, sea-road to the faraway land of his birth in the mists of time; he was to see, perhaps, the veritable shores of Hawaiki-nui, of Hawaiki-roa, of Hawaiki-pa-mamao, the shadowy land of legend whence his fathers came, sailing ever eastward to “the gateways of the day.” Somewhere there on the south coast of Asia, the Arabian littoral, his long-ago ancestors had sojourned, from a score of countries perhaps had drawn some of their racial PAGE 16traits; maybe it was from the sea-going Arabs of the Red Sea coasts that they derived their skill and enterprise as sailors. Now the Opé Hokowhitu a Tu was retracing the way to the first of many Hawaikis; it was a crusading army, upholding the name and fame of the Maori to the whole world. It might well be that those splendid young men would return no more. They paraded proudly before their fellow-countrymen, Maori and Pakeha. There was the spirit of the ancient Roman in their last march-past: “Ave Caesar, morituri te salutant!” They marched away to the sound of high and pathetic farewells: “Haere, haere! Haere, e hoki! Haere ki te ahi e ka mai ra i Oropi! E tama ma, kia kaha, kia maia, kia manawa-nui! Haere ra!”
Early on the morning of February 14th, the Maori troopship, which was commanded by Captain Edwin, quietly moved out from her Wellington berth and steamed away for Suez via her only Australian port of call, Albany. As the Indian Ocean was reported free of danger since the destruction of the German cruiser “Emden,” by H.M.A.S. “Sydney” at Cocos Island (November, 1914), there was no warship escort for the “Warrimoo” and her consorts the pakeha troopships “Maunganui,” “Tahiti” and “Aparima.” (The last named ship was afterwards sunk in the English Channel.) Captain Edwin took his ship close in to Cocos and gave the Maoris a good view of the battered enemy raider lying on the reef. There was one death on board during the voyage across the Indian Ocean, Corporal Mikaera Te Moananui
When passing through the Red Sea the Maoris heard the distant noise of a bombardment. It was a British cruiser shelling a Turkish position on the coast. On the voyage the musical talent in the Contingent was assembled and a band was formed under the direction of Captain Pirimi Tahiwi and Lieut. Stainton.
The Maoris disembarked at Suez and entrained for Cairo, where they were loudly welcomed by the pakeha New Zealanders, and marched out to Zeitoun Camp. A week there, and then came orders for Malta, whither the transport Runic carried the Maoris, to begin garrison duty at Ghain Tuffiah Camp (about 16 miles from Valetta).
PAGE BREAK
Hon. A. T. Ngata, M.A., LL.B. Member of Parliament for Eastern Maori District, and Member of Maori Regimental Committee.
Hon. A. T. Ngata, M.A., LL.B. Member of Parliament for Eastern Maori District, and Member of Maori Regimental Committee.
Hon. A. T. Ngata, M.A., LL.B.


Member of Parliament for Eastern Maori District, and Member of Maori Regimental Committee.

PAGE BREAK
Mr. Tau Henare, M.P. for Northern Maori District. Member of the Maori Recruiting Board and Regimental Committee.
Mr. Tau Henare, M.P. for Northern Maori District. Member of the Maori Recruiting Board and Regimental Committee.
Mr. Tau Henare, M.P. for Northern Maori District.


Member of the Maori Recruiting Board and Regimental Committee.

PAGE 17Major Peacock, who had trained the Contingent in the Avondale camp, had been given command of the force for the voyage and overseas service, but, to his own great grief and to the deep regret of his men, he was taken seriously ill on the passage and had to be landed in West Australia, and invalided home. The Maoris were very sorrowful over this misfortune, for Major Peacock was not only an excellent instructor and capable leader but he had a real liking for the Maori people, and his sympathetic attitude heartened them greatly. His place was taken by Major Herbert, who was given the command of the Contingent on arrival in Egypt and retained it atGallipoli until after the battle of Sari Bair (August, 1915), when he was appointed to the command of a British battalion. Major Peacock, on resuming duty in New Zealand, was placed in command of the training camp established at Narrow Neck, overlooking Rangitoto Channel, Auckland. Here the work of training Maori and South Sea Islands recruits was carried on after the evacuation of the Avondale camp. His death when in charge of the Paeroa Defence District in 1924 was a matter of grief to all his old comrades and indeed to all who had known him, whether in his military or his private capacity.

Recruiting the Reinforcements.

As time went on, the heavy wastage of the battlefields and the sickness, due to the conditions under which the War was waged, necessitated considerable reinforcements to keep the Contingent, or, as it became, the Pioneer Battalion, up to field strength. When the Battalion was in France in 1917, two returned soldiers, Lieuts. Te Awarau and Puke Cross, were engaged as recruiting officers in the North Island, going from tribe to tribe and addressing the people. A notable unofficial recruiting agent was Ruatapu-nui, the Urewera long-haired prophet aforetime, who, after getting the worst of a tussle with the police at Maunga-pohatu—a fatal affray in which one of his sons was shot dead—and serving a term of imprisonment, became a staunch supporter of the King's authority, and brought in towards the end of the war some fifty volunteers, his young men from Ruatoki and other settlements. The PAGE 18Arawa were particularly enthusiastic and self-sacrificing supporters of the British cause; even the elderly men were anxious to enlist. On August 9th, 1915, Hone Te Awe-Kotuku wrote to Sir Maui Pomare from Te Ngae, Rotorua: “We, the parents of those who went to Egypt, are sorry that we were left behind. We now hear that those up to 55 years are being listed. That age of life includes most of us, and the whole of the Arawa are agreed.” To this the reply was that only men between the ages of 20 and 40 years were being enlisted.
There was one important exception to the general eagerness of the tribes for active service abroad. This was Waikato, embracing most of the people under the mana of Rata Mahuta, the great-grandson of the famousPotatau te Wherowhero, the first Maori King. The Maori Kingdom, dating back to the Fifties of last century, was now but a shadow of its olden greatness, but the memory of the Waikato war, when ten thousand British and Colonial troops were required to subjugate the Kingites, was ever before Waikato, for in that war they lost the greater part of their lands, confiscated by the Crown. “Give us back Waikato,” had been their cry for fifty years. They neither forgot nor forgave that act of wholesale confiscation; and their perpetual grievance against the Government was made their excuse for declining to volunteer for the great war abroad. The Waikato, with their numerous clans, Ngati-Mahuta, Ngati-Naho, Ngati-te-ata, Ngati-Tipa, Ngati-Tahinga and others, and the Ngati-Haua—the tribe of that fine patriot of former days, Wiremu Tamehana Tarapipipi, the Maori Kingmaker—could have furnished a company of first-rate fighting men, athletic and enterprising. But the influence of their elders, the old diehards, who still regarded the Potatau family as their royal line, was sufficiently strong to prevent most of the young men from volunteering for the Opé Maori. They put up a passive resistance, declaring that, while they were willing to defend New Zealand from attack, they did not wish to serve outside the country.
The Maori Recruiting Committee, jointly with the Defence Department, made strenuous efforts to bring Waikato and allied tribes into line with the rest of the nation. Sir James Allen, Minister for Defence, Sir Maui Pomare, and several PAGE 19high chiefs of the tribe visited Waikato, argued with Rata, his “Premier” and chief adviser Tupu Taingakawa (the great Wiremu Tamehana's son), and appealed to the people to make common cause with their fellow-countrymen against the nation's foes. One of the most eloquent advocates of recruiting was Te Heuheu Tukino, M.L.C., the paramount chief of Ngati-Tuwharetoa, of the Taupo country. Te Heuheuwas loyal to his race and at the same time a thorough-going advocate of Maori participation in the great struggle overseas for the liberty of the world. The principal burden of persuading Waikato to enlist lay on the Hon. Sir Maui Pomare. In one of his speeches at a meeting with Waikato under Rata, at Waahi village, Sir Maui addressed his countrymen and constituents as follows:—

  • “Waikato, I return your greetings, according to the customs of our race. I have listened with an attentive ear to your words—the reasons why you are resisting the law. It is bad. You are not only grasping shadows, but you are kicking against the pricks. I will show you presently that you are untrue to the traditions and unfaithful to the sacred words of your great and illustrious dead.
  • “You say conscription is against the Treaty of Waitangi. I ask you to consider Clause Three of that Treaty. What does it say?—‘In consideration thereof (that is, in the Maori version, agreeing to the Government of the Queen) Her Majesty the Queen of England extends to the Natives of New Zealand her Royal protection, and imparts to them all the rights and privileges of British subjects.’ Now, our ancestors signed that treaty. They agreed to the Government of the Queen. I ask you this question,—What is a Government for? Is it not for the purpose of making laws? And what are laws for? Is it not for the protection of the members of the State? And are not the laws made for us to obey? Then, in order to keep the Treaty inviolate, we will have to keep the laws made by the Government that our ancestors accepted.
  • “The British monarch extended us the Royal protection. Has not that bargain been kept? Have we not been protected from that time to this? ‘And imparts to them all the rights and privileges of British subjects.’ Is it not our privilege and PAGE 20our right to fight for King and country? I want to point out to you that no right and no privilege can exist without the corresponding responsibility. Now do you see how the Treaty favours conscription, and how you have erred in regard to its provisions?
  • “Now in regard to Potatau. Do you recollect his coronation oath? When my predecessors made him King of the Maori tribes, do you remember what they said, ‘Potatau, we make you King. Henceforth you and Queen Victoria shall be united—the law shall be the carpet [whariki] for your feet and the religion of Christ your joint religion for ever.’ And what did Potatau say? ‘Yes, for ever. There is but one eye to the needle, through which the white, the black, and the red threads must pass.’ You tell me to-day that Potatau's needle must have more than one eye; for you contend that there should be a different law for the Maoris, that conscription should be a different law for the Maoris, that conscription should not apply to them. ‘Beware of Kura's urn, lest the dust from the feet of your ancestors arise and smother you.’
  • “It is true that Tawhiao (the second Maori King) spoke the words, which you have quoted, regarding the banishing of war from New Zealand, but were not these words uttered by him at a peace conference with the pakeha? Has not war been banished from these shores? Is there fighting between Pakeha and Maori to-day? ‘I have sheathed the sword.’ Mark, he did not turn the sword into a ploughshare, neither did he destroy it, but he sheathed the sword. Why? In order to protect the sword from rust and from being blunted, so that whenever the time should arise, when it should again be wanted, it would be found still keen and bright.
  • “Tawhiao returned all fighting across the sea. Where is the fighting now? Is it not across the sea? Therefore, in order to keep his words sacred, in order to keep the fighting across the seas, you must enlist, you must see that your sons fight across the waters, and not allow the foe to fight here. ‘Beware and do not shift the landmarks of your ancestors, lest the gods curse you.’
  • “Now I come to your fourth reason—the shedding of blood is against your religion. I ask, are you Christians? Did not Christ say, I come not to bring peace but a sword? Did hePAGE BREAK
    Mr. Henare Whakatau Uru, M.P. for Southern Maori District. Member of the Maori Regimental Committee.
    Mr. Henare Whakatau Uru, M.P. for Southern Maori District. Member of the Maori Regimental Committee.
    Mr. Henare Whakatau Uru, M.P. for Southern Maori District.

  • Member of the Maori Regimental Committee.
  • PAGE BREAK
    Group of Ngati-Tuwharetoa Soldiers taken at Opaea, Taihape, under the command of Lieut. K. H. Hakopa.
    Group of Ngati-Tuwharetoa Soldiers taken at Opaea, Taihape, under the command of Lieut. K. H. Hakopa.
    Group of Ngati-Tuwharetoa Soldiers taken at Opaea, Taihape, under the command of Lieut. K. H. Hakopa.
  • PAGE 21not say to Peter to catch a fish, and when the fish was gutted was not a coin with Caesar's superscription found on it? And did not the Founder of the Faith say, ‘Render unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's, and unto God the things which are God's.’ Now, Caesar is demanding from you the things which are his. Are you Christians?
“Which of you, having a child who is being tortured to death by another, will hand him a Bible and say, brother, love your neighbour as yourself. It is our Christian duty to root out all evil, and the greatest evil of the age is the German evil.
  • “You say the Pakeha must right the wrongs which he inflicted by the confiscation of our lands during the Maori war. I will not go into the merits or otherwise of your claim, because I know some of the confiscated lands were paid for by the ‘Takoha’ monies. That question involves a legal wrangle, which I hold you still have the option of bringing before a legal tribunal. That is a family quarrel. Put aside the petty quarrels of the family, and take hold of the battles of the Nation.”

Conscription Applied.

However, Waikato were obdurate, and as the other tribes, especially Te Arawa, Ngati-Porou and Ngapuhi, and also the Defence Department, considered that some degree of compulsion should be applied, the conscription principle embodied in the Military Service Act, 1916, was extended to the Maori race, by “Gazette” notice on June 26th, 1917. This Act provided for the compulsory calling up of suitable recruits for the Expeditionary Force. Waikato as a tribe held out to the end, on principle—though the refusal of the old people to sanction volunteering greatly chafed many of the young men—and it was deemed necessary to assert the law, in fairness to the other tribes, by compulsorily taking several young men to camp at Narrow Neck. One of these was young Te Rau-angaanga Mahuta, brother of Rata. Once in camp Te Rau entered cheerfully upon his training work, and so enamoured was he of soldiering duty under the wise and sympathetic command of Captain Peacock, that he wrote to his people announcing his PAGE 22conversion to the principle of service and appealing to them to fall in with the Government's wishes. He got his stripe as Lance-Corporal, and very likely would have obtained a commission, but by this time (August, 1918) the war was nearing its end, and Waikato's services, willing or otherwise, were not required.
After the application of the Military Service Act to the Maoris, three ballots were held. The first took place in May, 1918. The number of recruits actually produced by these ballots was small; most of those who served were volunteers. The Maoris called up in the three ballots, up to August 17th, numbered 479; of these 136 were passed fit. There were 51 men awaiting medical examination in November, 1918, 117 men had not been traced, and 146 had been classed C2. Nearly 80 names were struck off the lists after inquiry. The compilation of the Maori roll was a task of great difficulty. The Government statistician found it impossible to get the Maoris to complete their registration schedules, and other means had to be adopted of preparing a list of First Division natives of military age. For this purpose every Maori drawn in a ballot received, with the notification that he had been so drawn, a military order to parade on a specified date for medical examination.

The Polynesian Volunteers.

The men who came from the Pacific Islands to serve with the New Zealand forces were all volunteers. In response to the offers of assistance made by the Administration of the islands adjacent to New Zealand, voluntary recruits were accepted for service with the Maori section of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force. In some cases the Administration paid the cost of transport and equipment, and, further, paid the men themselves. Rarotongans, Niue men, Gilbert Islanders, Ellice Islanders, and others were brought over to New Zealand in such numbers as the Administrations decided on and received their training in this country before embarkation for active service abroad. Military and medical officers in the service of the Administrations of the island groups were appointed as attesting and medical officers respectively, so that, in the majority of cases the recruits were attested after PAGE 23having passed medically fit in the islands. Thus only fit men were sent to New Zealand and the procedure saved both Governments considerable expense. Of those sent to New Zealand 631 had embarked for active service or were in a camp of training in New Zealand on Armistice Day.
Throughout the period of the war, the welfare of the lads in the trenches was the constant thought and care of a hardworking committee of native ladies, under the presidency of Lady Pomare. In every kainga which had sent men to the war, the women and girls made or gathered together comforts for their loved ones on the battlefields, and these were sent to the central committee in Wellington, which toiled, too, at sewing and knitting for the soldiers. Large quantities of such articles as shirts and socks, packages of cigarettes and sweets, and cases of mutton-birds from Stewart Island and toheroa shellfish from the west coast of North Auckland, were despatched to the Battalion, and the periodical arrival of these proofs of the loving thought of the people in far-away New Zealand was a matter for great rejoicing in the billets and dugouts of war-swept France and Flanders.

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Maori and WW1

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RECRUITMENT OF MAORI. WHY DID THEY WISH TO GO AND FIGHT IN WW1?
http://www.digitalnz.org/records/41989?search%5Btext%5D=maori+and+ww1

This work by William Blomfield, entitled 'The spirit of his fathers', appeared in the Christmas, December 1915 issue of the New Zealand Observer. It shows a Māori soldier charging two Ottoman Turk soldiers with the ghost of a Māori warrior behind him. Cartoons like this attempted to evoke the spirit of the Māori god of war, Tū-mata-uenga, to encourage Māori participation in the war.

Credit
Alexander Turnbull Library

Reference: A-312-1-088

Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand, Te Puna Matauranga o Aotearoa, must be obtained before any reuse of this image.

maori and ww1 - recruitment poster.jpg




THIS INFORMATION BELOW IS FROM: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/war/maori-in-first-world-war/introduction


Maori and the First World War



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Calendar events

  • 14 February 1915
    Māori soldiers sail to war
    Māori soldiers sail to war


Te Puea Herangi
Te Puea Herangi
Te Puea Herangi
Maori had mixed views about the First World War. Some supported the war effort and rushed to join up. Others opposed the war as they did not want to fight for the British Crown, which was seen to have done much harm to Maori communities in the 19th century. The varied reactions reflected iwi experiences of British actions in the previous century.
While more than 2000 Maori would served in the Native Contingent and Pioneer Battalion (later the Maori Pioneer Battalion), others opposed the war effort. The application of conscription to Maori in 1917 brought the issue to a head. Those iwi who had land confiscated as a punishment for having been deemed to be in rebellion against the British Crown in the 1860s mounted a campaign of resistance. Leaders such as Te Puea Herangi gave important support to these men, some of whom were imprisoned for refusing to serve.


Maori Units of the NZEF


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Fighting for Empire


Maori Pioneer Battalion flag
Maori Pioneer Battalion flag
Maori Pioneer Battalion flag
When the First World war broke out, the Māori response was varied. Some opposed fighting for a Crown that had dispossessed them of land in the 19th century. Many others were keen to serve, but at first they had few options. Imperial policy initially opposed the idea of native peoples fighting in a war among Europeans.
This view changed as casualties mounted and the need for reinforcements grew. A Native Contingent left New Zealand in early 1915. It had a combat role at Gallipoli before being re-formed as a Pioneer Battalion to serve on the Western Front.
By the end of the war, 2227 Māori and 458 Pacific Islanders had served in what became known as the Maori Pioneer Battalion. Of these, 336 died on active service and 734 were wounded. Other Māori enlisted (and died) in other battalions as well.


White man's war? - Maori and the First World War


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White man's war?


To serve or not


The four Maori MPs were united in their support for Maori participation in the war. The MP for Northern Maori, Te Rangi Hiroa (Peter Buck), led by example and volunteered for service. He sailed with the first contingent in February 1915. He hoped that a wider sense of patriotism might break down the negative aspects of tribalism, which he believed was a handicap to Maori development. Apirana Ngata, MP for Eastern Maori, believed involvement would strengthen Maori claims for equal status with Pakeha.


Imperial policy opposed the idea of 'native peoples' fighting in a war among Europeans. There were fears that they might turn on their colonial masters or cause embarrassment by expecting equal treatment with European soldiers. When it was suggested that Maori be sent to garrison the newly captured German Samoa, New Zealand Administrator Robert Logan cabled the government to say that this might be provocative to the Samoan population. Instead, the Native Contingent of about 500 men left Wellington for Egypt on 14 February 1915.
During the early stages of the First World War there were frequent references to the 'Maori Contingent'. Officially it was called the Native Contingent. The use of the term 'native' in reference to Maori was not dropped from official use until 1947, largely on the initiative of Prime Minister Peter Fraser who was also the Minister of Native Affairs.
Some historians argue that it was in battle that many New Zealanders saw Maori not only as soldiers but as individuals for the first time. (Others note that Maori and non-Maori men had been playing rugby together for decades.) It was perhaps ironic that these New Zealanders had to go to Gallipoli and France to find out about themselves and each other.


SOME MAORI RESISTED BEING FORCED TO GO AND FIGHT [ CONSCRIPTION]




Resistance to conscription - Maori and the First World War



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For whose 'King and Country'?

In his recruitment waiata, 'Te ope tuatahi', Ngata made it clear that the replacement recruits that he and his colleagues had raised had come from Te Arawa and the East Coast tribes of Te Aitanga-a-Mahaki, Te Aitanga-a-Hauiti, Ngati Porou and Ngati Kahungunu. These were all tribes noted for their loyalty to the Crown. Their tribal elders were influenced by ideals of patriotic service and the obligations of citizenship inherent in their ancestors' signed commitment to the Treaty of Waitangi. Naming them was an expression of honour and also an implied criticism of those not mentioned.
Those Maori who had not responded to the call to fight for 'King and Country' were largely from Taranaki and TainuiWaikato. Their absence reflected the events of the 1860s when their land had been confiscated as punishment for being in so-called rebellion against the British Crown. The important Waikato leader Te Puea Herangi was guided by the words of her grandfather King Tawhiao. After he had finally made his peace with the Crown in 1881, he forbade Waikato to take up arms again:

  • Listen, listen, the sky above, the earth below, and all the people assembled here. The killing of men must stop; the destruction of land must stop. I shall bury my patu in the earth and it shall not rise again ... Waikato, lie down. Do not allow blood to flow from this time on.
Te Puea and others in the Waikato took this as an injunction never to fight again. Te Puea was also of the view that Waikato had 'its own King' and didn't need to 'fight for the British King'. If land that had been confiscated (when Waikato had fought for their king) in the 1860s was returned, then perhaps Waikato might reconsider its position.
In 1917 in response to questions about Maori involvement in the war, the Maori King, Te Rata, had adopted a position that it was a matter of individual choice and that no one should be forced to serve.
Attitudes like these deeply embarrassed Maui Pomare, the MP for Western Maori and chairman of the Native Contingent Committee, as these iwi were in his electorate.
Of the 314 recruits who sailed for Europe with the third draft of the native contingent in February 1916, only 111 were Maori. The rest were volunteers from Niue, Rarotonga, and the Gilbert and Ellice Islands. Pomare attempted to invoke the will of Tu-mata-uenga (the god of war) and appealed to a sense of utu in encouraging Maori to enlist. These attempts fell largely on deaf ears.
In 1916 conscription for military service was introduced to maintain New Zealand's supply of reinforcements. The Military Service Act 1916 initially imposed conscription on Pakeha only. Pomare wanted it applied to Maori. His wish was granted in June 1917 when the failure of the Native Contingent Committee to meet its reinforcement quotas (150 men every four weeks) saw the act extended to Maori. The conscription issue brought Maori opposition to participation in the war to a head.

Waikato resistance

As Waikato was seen as the centre of opposition to Maori participation, conscription was only imposed on Maori from TainuiWaikato. It was also argued that other iwi had 'done their bit'. The Waikato leader, Te Puea Herangi, supported those men who resisted conscription by gathering them up at Te Paina, a pa she had rebuilt at Mangatawhiri. Her stance attracted a lot of hostility from other Maori and Pakeha who accused her of being a German sympathiser.
Those Waikato men who refused to report for training when balloted in 1918 were arrested and taken to Narrow Neck training camp at Auckland. Any who refused to wear the army uniform were subjected to severe military punishments, including 'dietary punishments' (being fed only bread and water) and being supplied with minimal bedding.
Only a handful of the Tainui conscripts were ever put into uniform and none were sent overseas. By 1919 only 74 Maori conscripts had gone to camp out of a total of 552 men called. The imposition of conscription on the Waikato people had long-lasting effects, and the breach it caused was probably only restored with the Tainui Treaty settlement in 1995.
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THE MAORIS IN THE GREAT WAR

LIST OF DEAD, GALLIPOLI, 1915, — FRANCE AND FLANDERS, 1916-1918

from: http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/tei-CowMaor-t1-back-d1-d1-d1.html#name-130620-mention

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List of Dead, Gallipoli, 1915,


France and Flanders, 1916-1918.

The following is a complete list of fatal casualties in the Maori Contingent, Gallipoli, 1915, and the Maori Pioneer Battalion, France and Flanders, 1916-1918, together with other deaths (accidental and disease) on active service. The details are from the Defence Department's official list of total deaths in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force during the War:—
16/1007
Adam, Kiro Luke, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 7/10/17.
16/598
Akena, Rakapa, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 16/6/18.
19840
Albert, Windy, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 29/5/19.
9/1256
Allison, Wm., Pte. Killed in Action, France, 15/9/16.
16/1392
Anaru, Albert Paul, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 7/6/17.
19460
Andrews, William Wilson, Pte. Accidentally Killed, France, 20/1/18.
16/583
Angel, Edward, L.-Cpl. Died of Wounds, France, 29/12/17.
16/1182
Anthony, Manuel, Cpl. Died, New Zealand ex France, 10/5/17.
16/1365
Apatari, Manu, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 14/9/16.
16/87
Aramataku, Herewini, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 6/8/15.
16/1139
Arii —, Pte. Died, France, 24/8/16.

16/524
Baker, Whare, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 21/8/15.
19236
Banaba, Beni, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex Egypt, 16/9/17.
16/435
Barton, Whare, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 2/9/16.
22759
Bourke, John Joseph, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 15/9/16.
19671
Bristowe, Sam, Pte. Died, France, after Armistice, 5/4/19.
9/1014
Brooke, Burton, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 5/6/16.
16/1469
Brown, Henry, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 19/6/17.

9/908
Cameron, John Donald, 2nd Lieut. Killed in Action, France, 7/8/17.
16/572
Carroll, Tuahae, Cpl. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 10/12/15.
16/567
Christie, Hapi, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex Gallipoli, 10/12/15.
19423
Clark, Clark, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 19/11/17.
20787
Conrad, Paki, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 6/12/18.
16/1299
Cook, George Gray, Pte. Died, France, 12/10/18.
9/1412
Cooper, George Begg, Pte. Died, France, 8/12/18.
19564
Cootes, Taipua Skipworth, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 29/10/19
16/260
Coupar, Simon James Stuart, Lieut. Killed in Action, France, 29/6/16.
9/1274
Crawshaw, Samuel, Pte. Died, France, 6/1/19.
19459
Curtis, Joseph, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 8/10/17.PAGE 163
23150
Dale, Charles Martin, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 5/5/17.
16/575a
Danger, James, Cpl. Died of Wounds, France, 3/9/17.
19703
Davy, Para, Pte. Died of Disease, France, 8/11/18.
16/93
Delamere, Heremeta, Sgt. Accidentally Killed, France, 13/6/16.
19699
Dickson, Harry, Pte. Died, New Zealand, 13/11/18.
16/508
Downes, Albert, Pte. Died, Malta ex Egypt, 9/9/15.
16/373
Duff, Matene Rangiamohia, Sgt. Died of Wounds, France, 1/9/16.

38513
Edmonds, Bennie, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 31/12/17.
16/579a
Ellison, Thomas, L.-Cpl. Killed in Action, France, 14/9/16.
16/439
Emery, Peter, Pte. Died, Egypt, 28/8/15.
16/1509
Epiha, Daniel, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 7/10/17.
16/580a
Eruera, Whiti, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 7/6/17.
7/1461
Evans, James, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 15/9/16.

16/982
Fairlie, Godfrey Alexander, T/Sgt. Killed in Action, France, 5/4/18.
16/519
Ferris, Donald, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 8/8/15.
9/1007
Field, Alfred Thornley, Sgt. Killed in Action, France, 18/9/16.
16/1046
Filitoua —, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 19/6/16.
8/3579
Fisher, Charles, Cpl. Killed in Action, France, 18/6/17.
16/1480
French, Samuel James, Cpl. Died at Sea, 17/8/16.

16/36a
Geary, John, L.-Cpl. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 8/8/15.
16/65
Grace, Abraham Turei, Pte. Died, Egypt, 21/10/15.
19745
Grace, Samuel, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 19/2/18.
20711
Graham, George, Pte. Died at Sea en route to New Zealand, 25/3/19.

20811
Haenga, Heremia Tawhero, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 31/12/17.
16/1558
Hakaraia, John, Pte. Died, France, 14/11/17.
16/5
Hale, Richard, Sgt. Killed in Action, France, 14/8/17.
16/6
Hamana, Kingi, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 3/10/16.
16/536
Hape, Hona, Pte., M.I.D. Died, United Kingdom, 11/4/19.
16/949
Hape, Tere, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 24/6/17.
16/750
Happy, Dick, Pte. Died, France, 17/12/16.
19351
Hapuku, Manukea, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 7/12/17.
16/267
Harding, Joseph, Pte. Died of Wounds, Egypt ex Gallipoli, 14/8/15.
20769
Harding, Whetu, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 6/8/17.
16/370
Hare, Heremaia, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 7/8/15.
19680
Harmon, James, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 18/3/18.
7/2018
Harris, Edward, Capt., M.I.D. Died of Wounds, France, 18/9/16.
16/950
Haruiti, Henry, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 23/12/17.
16/391
Hekiera, Remihana, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 4/5/17.
16/1320
Hemi, Skipper Pori, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 10/9/16.
16/176
Herewini, Hohepa, Pte. Died of Wounds, Gallipoli, 21/9/15.
16/325
Heteraka, Haroe, Pte. Died, Mudros ex Gallipoli, 16/8/15.
20069
Hetekia, Ngahana, Pte. Died, France, 3/11/18.
20875
Hill, Hemi, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 7/6/17.
16/4537a
Hill, Percy, W.O.2., M.I.D. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 9/8/15.
16/597
Hillman, Charlie, Pte. Accidentally Killed (run over by vehicle), France, 20/8/16.
16/1257
Hina, Pera, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 21/7/17.
16/379
Hiroti, Rangihiwinui, Pte. Died, France, 5/6/16.
9/1439
Hitchon, Frank Horton, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 12/9/16.PAGE 164
19786
Hohepa, Puehu, Pte. Died, New Zealand, 30/12/17.
23/2204
Holmes, Arthur, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 20/12/17.
16/606
Houia, Wiremu Peha [sic: Peka], L.-Cpl. Died of Wounds, France, 27/9/16.
16/556
Hovell, George Woodward, Pte. Died of Wounds, United Kingdom ex Gallipoli, 20/10/15.
16/1442
Huki, Raymond, Pte. Died at Sea en route to New Zealand, 8/4/17.
7/2044
Humphries, Thomas James, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 8/6/16.
20856
Hunia, Te Ruawai, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 31/12/17.
19355
Hunter, Jack, L.-Cpl. Died of Wounds, France, 6/10/17.
16/1339
Hura, Raukawa, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 10/4/17.
16/1238
Huriwaka, George, Pte. Died, France, 6/6/16.
20026
Huta, Meihana, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 24/3/18.

16/240
Johnson, William, Cpl. Died of Wounds, France, 5/8/16.
16/1453
Jones, Charles, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 23/2/17.

16/620
Kaa, Pekama, Capt. Killed in Action, France, 14/8/17.
60875
Kahaki, Whare, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 19/2/19.
16/1062
Kaimanu, Pte. Died, Egypt, 15/3/16.
16/10
Kaipara, Autiri Pitara, 2nd Lieut. Killed in Action, France, 4/8/17.
19634
Kaiwai, Harold, Pte. Died, France, 1/5/18.
16/629
Kaiwai, Reweti, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 14/9/16.
16/634
Kanapu, Horomona, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 30/11/17.
16/937
Kara, Taha, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 5/4/18.
16/1491
Karapaina, Hakota, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 14/9/16.
19948
Karapaina, Paratene, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 31/1/19.
19860
Karauria, Meihana, Pte. Died, France, 24/7/18.
16/394
Karena, Wero Mohi, Cpl. Killed in Action, France, 30/11/17.
16/271
Karetai, Stewart, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 21/8/15.
16/95
Kawhia, Eruera, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 8/6/16.
20678
Kemp, Kawenata, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 28/1/18.
20771
Kereama, Hori, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 30/11/17.
20844
Kihi, Pua, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 11/8/17.
16/802
King, Kohi, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 14/9/16.
16/621
Kingi, Tauiti, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 2/1/18.
16/1018
Kohere, Henare Mokena, 2nd Lieut. Died of Wounds, France, 16/9/16.
20/598
Kokiri, Tango, 2nd Lieut. Died at Sea en route to United Kingdom, 21/4/17.
16/552
Konuke, Pat, Pte. Died, France, 14/4/18.
16/643
Kopua, Whetuki, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 4/8/17.
16/1477
Korako, H., Pte. Killed in Action, France, 19/6/17.
16/399
Kumeroa, te Aohau, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 25/9/16.

16/1418
Lazarus, Jack, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 24/9/16.
20715
Leefe, George, Pte. Died New Zealand, 30/12/18.
16/807
Luke, Peter, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 31/7/17.

9/165
McIntyre, William Nichol, Cpl. Killed in Action, France, 15/9/16.
23255
McKay, Robert Patrick, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 7/6/17.
19728
McLean, Thomas, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 17/12/17.
16/809
McNicol, Duncan Bannetyne, 2nd Lieut. Died of Wounds, France, 4/8/17.
19562
Maaka, Henri, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 31/8/19.
PAGE BREAK
Interior of the Maori War Memorial Church at Kahukura, Waiapu Valley, East Cape. This beautiful church, which has a memorial window symbolising the Maori effort in the Great War, was erected by the Ngati-Porou tribe in honour of their soldiers. The Governor-General of the Dominion, General Sir Charles Fergusson, took part in the opening ceremonies, February 16th, 1926.
Interior of the Maori War Memorial Church at Kahukura, Waiapu Valley, East Cape. This beautiful church, which has a memorial window symbolising the Maori effort in the Great War, was erected by the Ngati-Porou tribe in honour of their soldiers. The Governor-General of the Dominion, General Sir Charles Fergusson, took part in the opening ceremonies, February 16th, 1926.
Interior of the Maori War Memorial Church at Kahukura, Waiapu Valley, East Cape.


This beautiful church, which has a memorial window symbolising the Maori effort in the Great War, was erected by the Ngati-Porou tribe in honour of their soldiers. The Governor-General of the Dominion, General Sir Charles Fergusson, took part in the opening ceremonies, February 16th, 1926.

PAGE 165|| 16/400

Mangaroa, Ngore William, Pte. Died of Disease following Wounds, Malta ex Gallipoli, 30/12/15.
25556
Mangaroa, Thompson, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 9/6/19
16/189
Manihera, Waitere, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 6/8/15.
16/656
Manuel, Josiah, Sgt. Died of Wounds, New Zealand ex France, 21/6/17.
16/340
Manuel, Richard, L.-Cpl. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 8/8/15.
16/657
Manuel, Tiweka, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 25/3/18.
10/117
Maraki, Tautuhi, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 9/8/15.
16/139
Marino, Hohepa, Pte. Died of Wounds, Gallipoli, 2/9/15.
19621
Maranui, Pona, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 23/12/17.
19361
Mason, Harry, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 12/1/19.
4/1128
Masters, George, 2nd Lieut., M.I.D. Killed in Action, France, 3/4/17.
16/663
Matana, Karauria, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 19/9/16.
16/1189
Matau —, Pte. Died, France, 29/8/16.
16/810
Matenga, Tuheke, Pte. Drowned, United Kingdom, 14/5/18.
16/1557
Matheu, Wetini, Pte. Died, France, 28/12/18.
16/1285
Matai, Tuherini, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 1/9/17.
16/385
Mete, Kingi Henare, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 14/9/16.
16/383
Mete, Kingi Teira Hoani, Cpl. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 8/8/15.
16/207
Mihaere Taiamai, L.-Cpl. Died of Wounds, France, 9/12/17.
16/278
Mira, William, Pte. Died, Egypt ex Gallipoli, 9/2/16.
16/1378
Mitchell, Ernest, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 24/9/16.
16/1089
Mitikele —, Pte. Died, Egypt, 16/5/16.
16/1088
Moki, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 30/6/16.
16/222
Mokomoko, Nopera Hape, Pte. Died, Egypt, 2/9/15.
16/555
Moore, Sunny, Cpl. Died, France, 24/4/18.
16/680
Morehu, Hakopa, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 2/6/17.
16/344
Morgan, Joseph Iraia, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 29/7/17.
19399
Morris, Benjamin, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 22/8/18.
20846
Murray, Raika Whakarongotai, L.-Cpl. Killed in Action, France, 31/12/17.

16/686
Newton, James, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 5/8/17.
16/185
Ngamu, Hoani, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 6/8/15.
16/958
Ngatoro, Renata, Pte. Died, Egypt, 14/1/16.
19371
Nicholls, Frederick, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 6/10/18.
16/164
Nicholls, Thompson William, Cpl., M.M. Died, New Zealand, 6/11/18.
20885
Nikorima, Fred, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 21/6/17.

16/689
O'Neill, John Irvine, 2nd Lieut. Killed in Action, France, 3/10/16.
10251
Ovens, John, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 29/9/16.

20625
Padlie, David, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 6/8/17.
16/1536
Paki, Rimi, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 10/3/18.
16/28
Paku, Akuhata, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 21/8/15.
16/201
Paora, Paetaha, Pte. Died, Malta ex Gallipoli, 4/2/16.
16/493
Papuni, Kurei, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 6/8/15.
16/346
Para, Paki Whetu, Pte. Died of Wounds, New Zealand exGallipoli, 9/5/16.
16/566
Parata, Paul, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 17/5/17.
9/1086
Park, Douglas Murgall, Sgt. Killed in Action, France, 15/9/16.
16/931
Patara, Hiroki Rere, Pte. Died, Egypt, 2/11/15.PAGE 166
19740
Patara, Nele, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 31/12/17.
16/30
Peka, Hohepa, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 10/3/20.
19732
Pene, Enoka William, Pte. Died, New Zealand, 22/10/19.
16/284
Peneamene, Tumaru, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex Gallipoli, 18/9/15.
16/1115
Peni, Meta, Pte. Died at Sea en route to New Zealand, 23/6/16.
16/703
Pera, Hue, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 19/2/18.
16/33
Pera, Piana, Pte. Died of Injuries (Railway accident), France, 16/4/16.
16/246
Pineata, Watarawi, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 29/9/16.
16/1126
Pineka, Pte. Died at Sea en route to New Zealand, 4/7/16.
19427
Pirimi, Egbert, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 14/7/16.
16/34
Pohatu, Renata, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 13/7/16.
60789
Pohipi, Waikura, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 16/2/19.
9/1091
Poole, Thomas Henry, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 15/9/15.
16/410
Popoki, Te Ao, Pte. Died, Egypt, 15/8/15.
16/287
Porete, August Paani, Pte. Died, Egypt ex Gallipoli, 11/9/15.
19877
Potatau, Tipene, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 10/6/19.
16/388
Potonga, Tame, Pte. Died, New Zealand, 30/12/15.
20743
Poutawera, James, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 18/12/17.
16/198
Power, Hone Manahi, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 7/12/17.
16/1107
Pulu —, Sgt. Died at Sea en route to New Zealand, 26/6/16.

9/1725
Quin, Thomas George, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 15/9/16.

20402
Rakiraki, John, Pte. Died, France, 3/5/18.
16/1574
Rameka, Percy, Pte. Died at Sea en route to N.Z. ex France, 26/5/18.
16/37
Rangi, Hapi, Pte. Died, Egypt, 5/11/15.
16/449
Rangi, Horima, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 4/8/17.
60500
Rangitauwira, Wiremu, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 31/3/18.
16/580
Rapihana, Herewini, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 6/8/15.
16/525
Rapona, Kiri, Pte. Died of Wounds, United Kingdom ex France, 29/9/16.
20736
Raroa, William, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 6/12/18.
19411
Rata, Jerry, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 20/6/18.
16714
Ratana, Wiremu, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 30/7/16.
16/91
Ratana, Nepia, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 7/8/15.
4/52a
Reid, Lestock Henry, 2nd Lieut. Killed in Action, France, 20/5/16.
16/720
Reiroa, Martin Wesley, Pte. Died, France, 31/8/16.
16/115
Rewa, George Rangitikei, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 31/8/16
19755
Rewharewha, Henare, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 31/12/17.
20664
Rewi, Peremara, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 23/3/17.
16/102
Richmond, Tom, Pte. Died of Wounds, Egypt ex Gallipoli, 9/9/15.
16/723
Rickus, Thomas Samuel, Pte. Died of Wounds at Sea en route to New Zealand ex France, 5/8/17.
60809
Rihari, Neri, Pte. Died, New Zealand, 19/2/20.
16/199
Ropata, Pahia, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 6/8/15.
20630
Ruha, John, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 21/7/17.
19303
Ruka, Willie, Pte. Died, Australia en route to United Kingdom, 28/1/17.
16/61
Ruhinga, Waretini, Sgt. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 1/9/15.
16/1459
Ruru, Vivian, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 14/8/17.
18707
Ryan, Edward John, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 9/6/17.PAGE 167
16/888
Savage, Charles, Sgt. Killed in Action, France, 21/6/17.
19883
Savage, John Joseph, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 2/3/18.
13/2150
Saxby, Conrad Gordon, Lieut.-Col., D.S.O., M.I.D. Died, United Kingdom, 27/11/18.
9/1218
Scaife, Stanley Tancred, Cpl. Killed in Action, France, 15/9/16.
13114
Scully, Ernest Charles, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 6/6/17.
9/1354
Short, James, Lt. Died of Wounds, France, 28/5/16.
16/591
Sidney, William, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 21/8/15.
16/506
Simpson, George, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 21/8/15.
16/869
Skelton, Harold George Nepia, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 8/8/17.
19429
Slade, Joseph, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 25/6/18.
16/735
Smith, Frank, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 15/9/16.
19417
Smith, Haka, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 19/11/17.
19394
Smith, Hoani, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 11/4/18.
20015
Smith, Temete, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 27/12/18
16/1196
Solomona, L.-Cpl. Died, New Zealand, 3/4/17.

16/68
Taewa, Rawiri, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 21/8/15.
16/358
Tahu, Ngakepa, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 6/8/15.
16/113
Tairua, Joseph, Pte. Accidentally Killed (aeroplane accident) United Kingdom, 13/2/19.
16/933
Taiwhanga, Hirini, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 21/6/17.
16/474
Take, William, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 6/8/15.
16/740
Takoko, Hori, L.-Cpl. Killed in Action, France, 24/12/17.
16/891
Takuao, Paul, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 8/6/16.
16/1132
Taleva, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 12/6/16.
16/418
Tamarapa, Waikohari, Pte. Died, Mudros ex Gallipoli, 12/10/15.
20656
Tamati, Poururu, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 15/10/17.
16/963
Tamauahi, Papara, Cpl. Killed in Action, France, 5/4/18.
16/1504
Tangaere, Hori, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 16/3/18.
16/840
Tapsell, Robert, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 16/9/16.
16/1199
Taringa, Pte. Died, France, 15/8/16.
16/1155
Tauetuli, Pte. Died, France, 9/6/16
19753
Tuakamo, Waata, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 31/12/17.
16/1165
Taumataua, Pte. Died, New Zealand, 19/12/16.
16/78
Taumaunu, Hare, Pte. Died, Mudros ex Gallipoli, 11/10/15.
16/955
Taupaki, Rameka, L.-Cpl. Killed in Action, France, 31/12/17.
16/1202
Taura —, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 7/1/17.
19524
Taurere, Tepana, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 4/8/17.
16/1479
Tawhai, Hohepa Taupaki, Pte. Died, France, 7/12/16.
19744
Te Ara, Nati, Pte. Died at Sea ex France, 5/4/19.
16/512
Te Awarau, Hori Karaka, Pte. Died, Egypt, 13/9/15.
16/964
Te Hau, Pera, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 5/4/18.
19528
Te Hui, Haora, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 25/4/18.
19398
Te Kauru, John, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 4/8/17.
16/753
Te Kuru, Piki-Kotuku, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 4/8/17.
19770
Te Maro, Herewini, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 19/3/20.
60895
Te Mete, Wiremu, Pte. Died, United Kingdom, 11/2/19.
16/477
Te Moananui, Mikaera, Cpl. Died at Sea en route to Egypt, 6/3/15.
16/181
Te Moni, Matehaere, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 6/8/15.
20048
Te Moni, Ratapu, Pte. Died, New Zealand, 14/8/19.
16/42
Te Ngaio, Wharekete, Pte. Died, Egypt, 24/3/16.
16/183
Te Otimi, Pitonga, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 8/8/15.PAGE 168
29104
Teparo, Hohepa, Pte. Accidentally Killed (thrown from horse), France, 26/8/17.
16/922
Tepene, James, Pte. Died, New Zealand, 10/11/16.
16/1222
Tepuretu, Apu, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 30/9/16.
16/1389
Te Raina, Te Weka, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 15/6/18.
16/760
Te Rore, Te Hu, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 3/6/17.
16/1390
Te Tuhi, Nikora, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 4/8/17.
16/846
Te Ua, Te Miere, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 21/7/17.
16/421
Te Whare, Taiawhiao, Pte. Died of Wounds, Malta ex Gallipoli, 31/7/15.
20621
Te Whata, Peter, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 23/3/17.
16/360a
Thompson, Richard, Pte. Died of Wounds, at Sea ex Gallipoli, 9/8/15.
16/363
Tiatoa, Pita, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 15/9/16.
16/364
Tiini, Hopa, Pte. Died, Egypt, 16/1/16.
16/1134
Timoko, Pte. Died, New Zealand, 21/9/16.
16/303
Timuiha, John, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 7/6/17.
16/1133
Tionesini, Cpl. Died, France, 31/5/16.
19572
Tipere, Wi Parata, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 11/4/18.
16/1164
Tiueatana —, Pte. Died at Sea en route to New Zealand, 27/6/16.
20735
Toheriri, Moetu, Pte. Died, New Zealand, 13/3/18.
16/98
Toheriri, Reupena, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 14/12/17.
60599
Toi Tukapa, Pte. Died, France, 30/12/18.
16/103
Toka, Taare, L.-Cpl. Killed in Action, France, 9/7/16.
16/480
Tua, James, Pte. Died of Wounds, at Sea ex Gallipoli, 14/8/15.
16/123
Tuati, Pareiha, Pte. Died of Wounds, Mudros ex Gallipoli, 16/8/15.
16/46
Tuahiwi, Wiremu, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 19/6/17.
16/769
Tuhora, Potene, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 13/1/17.
20616
Tuki Manu, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 7/6/17.
16/125
Tunoa, Hamiora, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 21/8/15.

16/1179
Vaihola, Pte. Died at Sea en route to New Zealand, 28/6/16.
16/1177
Vasau, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 11/6/16.
16/1203
Vavia, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 1/10/16.

20823
Waaka, Hapi, Pte. Died, France, 27/12/18.
20816
Waaka, Hohepa, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 12/4/18.
16/1297
Waetford, Eugene, Pte. Died, France, 5/5/16.
16/482
Wahia, Moa, Pte. Died at Sea ex Gallipoli, 9/9/15.
16/426
Wahia, Thomas, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 6/8/15.
16/53
Wairau, Ra, Pte. Died of Wounds, Malta ex Gallipoli, 11/9/15.
16/779
Wairau, Raniera, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 30/10/16.
16/549
Waiti, Haureki, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 21/8/15.
9/227
Walker, James Alexander, Cpl. Died of Wounds, France, 28/5/17.
16/564
Warakihi, Poihipi, Pte. Killed in Action, Gallipoli, 21/8/15.
9/1620
Ward, Arthur, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 9/9/16.
19661
Warena, John Tana, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 1/11/17.
16/1354
Warena, Kitohi, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 20/10/17.
16/368
Waru, Henare, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 8/6/16.
16/369
Waru, Kopa, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 8/6/17.
9/96
Watson, Norman Forrester, 2nd Lieut. Killed in Action, France, 12/10/17.PAGE 169
47562
Watson, Rihari, Pte. Died, France, 24/11/18.
11/2504
Webb, Roland, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 15/9/16.
19604
Webster, Jack, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 29/11/17.
16/382
Whakarua, Herewini, W.O.2. Died of Wounds, France, 13/1/18.
20779
Wharepapa, Turi, Cpl. Killed in Action, France, 23/12/17.
16/145
Whareraupo, Tuakana-Kore, L.-Cpl. Died of Wounds, Gallipoli, 6/8/15.
19669
Whareihiti, Nikora, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 24/1/19
19726
Wharewhiti Rikihana, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 28/10/18.
16/789
Whitau, Arapata Koti P., Pte. Killed in Action, France, 8/6/16.
16/188
Whitau, Puaka, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex Gallipoli, 10/10/15.
20845
Whyte, Walter, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 15/9/18.
19474
Wi, Henry Wi Waka, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 8/2/18.
16/858
Wickham, Mema, 2nd Lieut. Died of Injuries (shot by soldier), France, 31/12/18.
20665
Wiki, Frank, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 3/6/17.
16/1291
Wiki, Whiro, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 16/10/18.
16/371
Wikitera, Robert, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 19/11/17.
19779
Williams, James, Pte. Died, United Kingdom ex France, 30/9/18.
16/112
William, Joe, Pte. Died at Sea ex Gallipoli, 13/8/15.
20624
Williams, Willie, Cpl. Died of Wounds, France, 4/9/18.
16/462
Winiana, Ponga, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 14/8/17.
16/1398
Wipani, John, Pte. Died, France, 31/12/18.
20778
Witana, Abraham, Pte. Died, France, 1/11/17.
16/431
Wood, Charlie, Pte. Killed in Action, France, 8/7/17.
16/308
Woods, George, Pte. Died, New Zealand ex France, 10/12/19.
20704
Wynyard, John, Pte. Died of Wounds, France, 8/6/17.