https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rbYwNOcKqqc&safe=active
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7k20VFZeLKY interview with a survivor


THIS INFORMATION DIRECTLY BELOW IS FROM:http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/armistice-day-celebrations-christchurch


external image armistice-chch.jpg?itok=9r1Rr1Hh

Crowd gathered in Cathedral Square, Christchurch after the Armistice procession on 12 November 1918.

As the second wave of the influenza pandemic spread throughout the country many New Zealanders found a reason to celebrate: an armistice had been signed between the Allies and Germany on 11 November.
In Auckland the District Health Officer, Dr Joseph Frengley, banned any official celebrations. He was concerned that if crowds formed, as they had when false news of an armistice had circulated on 8 November, the disease would spread further. But official celebrations did go ahead in many other towns and cities, and it is believed that these celebrations contributed significantly to the spread of the disease. In Christchurch the show and race meetings of Carnival Week in the preceding days were also a factor.
It is unclear whether people were ignorant of the severity of the disease spreading throughout the country, or if they were simply determined to celebrate the Armistice. Auckland was struck first, but by 11 November there were indications of the severity of the disease elsewhere. In Wellington, for example, celebrations occurred at the same time as the first inhalation chambers and emergency hospitals opened. In Dunedin, celebrations went ahead despite a warning against ‘crowded assemblages’ from the District Health Officer, Dr Irwin Faris. Even those staffing the inhalation booths were given time off to attend.

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Those suffering from influenza had little interest in celebrating the end of the First World War. To listen go to: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/sound/armistice-day-influenza-pandemic

Transcript

[Woman speaking] Well, I was very bad in bed. I worked at dressmaking, and I just fell on the table and got taken home in a taxi, and I … had to sit up in bed when the war was over and wave a little flag; I couldn’t go out to celebrate. My boyfriend was away at the war at the time.
[Woman speaking] And it came, Armistice Day. I went to town early that morning – a friend came and drove me in – as we simply had to have more hospitals, more room to nurse cases. I got into town just before 9 and the bells started ringing. I said, ‘Whatever’s going on?’ ‘It’s peace,’ they said, ‘Peace!’ How I loathed the sound of it. Everything shut up, and I could get nothing, not a thing until tomorrow. And that was just the day that I’m sure cost hundreds of lives. But simply had those people been able to be taken in to those hospitals that day, they might have been spared. But you couldn’t do a thing about it; it was peace and everyone was celebrating.

Credit
Radio New Zealand Sound Archives Ngā Taonga Kōrero. Any re-use of this audio is a breach of copyright. To request a copy of the recording, contact Sound Archives Ngā Taonga Kōrero. Reference: clip from The great plague, 1967 radio documentary by Jim Henderson, TCDR562




THERE WAS A HUGE NEED FOR NURSES. To listen to this go to: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/sound/need-for-nurses-1918-influenza-pandemic


A women describes the importance of the work of nurses and of the Red Cross in training them.

Transcript

[Woman speaking] Well, the Red Cross give girls or women training in home nursing at the beginning of every year, and if girls would only take that training, from my experience of the epidemic, it was one of the best things that they could do. It was a very good training for three months, and if anybody came into the hospital when we were desperate, you could even take a temperature or make a bed or [take] a pulse or had any idea of nursing, we would fall almost on our necks with gratitude because we didn't have to show them around, you see. We just said get to it, and we look after them, you see.
So ever since then I worked a good deal in the Red Cross, you see, in Hastings and Havelock, and my great idea is to get every girl trained that I could in this course of home nursing. We'll have epidemics again, and we'll have emergencies again, probably, of the Civil Defense now is working as you know probably, don't you? Well, what they wanted is people who can nurse. Don't you agree?

Credit
Radio New Zealand Sound Archives Ngā Taonga Kōrero. Any re-use of this audio is a breach of copyright. To request a copy of the recording, contact Sound Archives Ngā Taonga Kōrero. Reference: clip from The great plague, 1967 radio documentary by Jim Henderson, TCDR562



ALL SORTS OF CURES/REMEDIES WERE THOUGHT UP. To listen to this go to:
http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/sound/cures-the-1918-influenza-pandemic


All sorts of remedies were tried to cure victims of the pandemic. Many were of little use.

Transcript

[Man speaking] And I had a mate standing – we were on the corner – and he fell down by the lamp-post, and he hadn't had anything to drink that day. So then he managed to get home, and he had the black plague all right, black spots all over him, and he was taking mulled beer, if you know what that is, heated beer. It's no good. Every morning I visited him, and now he says, 'I'm going Harry.' Course I couldn't say otherwise. And then he recuperated!
[Woman speaking] Some used gargles and that sort of thing, and there was this formalin place. And the old-fashioned remedy of wearing a camphor bag, that was very prominent. And people had them on their children and on themselves, and, um, I don't know whether it had the effect, but sometimes just the thought that you got something like that is a help to people's morale, isn't it?
[Man speaking] Most of them got over it, but if you bled at the nose – if they bled at the nose – they got over it. If they didn't, they went black, and that was a finish.
[Woman speaking] I was living with my sister, and she would have a fire set ready for me to light with sulphur sprinkled all over the wood. Before I mixed with the family, I went to this room, lit the fire and bent over it and inhaled some of the fumes and was also fumigated at the same time. We kept away from crowds and never took home books from libraries.






influenza inhaler.jpg
An invention called an INFLUENZA INHALER


http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/object/27789/influenza-inhaler


MEMORIAL:
http://www.digitalnz.org/records/31933744?search%5Btext%5D=THE+INFLUENZA

influenza memorial.jpg
A memorial to those who died of the influenza.


Description:This wooden cenotaph at Te Kōura marae, between Ōngarue and Taumarunui, was made by renowned carver Tene Waitere of Ngāti Tarāwhai as a memorial to those who died in the influenza epidemic of 1918. It is estimated this epidemic killed 4% of the Māori population.


NURSES WERE GIVEN INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO TREAT PATIENTS WHO HAD THE INFLUENZA
http://www.digitalnz.org/records/1268018?search%5Btext%5D=THE+INFLUENZA
influenza instructions to nurses.jpg


http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media_gallery/tid/38


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THE EFFECT OF THE INFLUENZA ON WESTERN SAMOA AFTER WW1 FINISHED:
Approximately 8500 people, one-fifth of the population of Western Samoa, died during the influenza pandemic.

Influenza hits Samoa


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external image talune.jpg?itok=uIZ9CoKu
The steamship Talune at the Napier breakwater in 1908.
The second wave of the global influenza pandemic came to Western Samoa on board an island trader, the Talune, on 4 November 1918. The acting port officer at Apia was unaware that there was a severe epidemic at the ship's departure point, Auckland. As a result he allowed passengers ashore, ‘including six seriously ill influenza cases’. Within a week influenza had spread throughout the main island of Upolu and to the neighbouring island of Savai'i. Approximately 8500 people – a staggering one-fifth of the population – died.
Responsibility for the pandemic has been laid firmly at the feet of New Zealand. In 1918 Western Samoa was still occupied by New Zealand forces that had seized the German colony at the beginning of the First World War. In addition to not placing theTalune under quarantine, the New Zealand Administrator, Colonel Robert Logan, did not accept from the Governor of American Samoa an offer of assistance that may have reduced the heavy death toll.
In 2002 the New Zealand Prime Minister, Helen Clark, made an official apology to the Samoan people for the actions of the New Zealand authorities.

Credit
Alexander Turnbull Library
Reference: 1/2-080543-F
Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand, Te Puna Matauranga o Aotearoa, must be obtained before any re-use of this image.

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HEALTH BOARDS WERE ALLOWED TO TELL HOTELS AND CLUBS TO CLOSE TEMPORARILY


influenza notice giving authority to close hotels etc.jpg



THESE ARE FROM: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media_gallery/tid/38

influenza pandemic depot, 1918




external image flu-001.jpg?itok=sMR-cQUB
Central Medicine Depot, Cathedral Square, Christchurch, 4 December 1918. This photo shows the former Patriotic Bazaar converted by the Health Department to dispense 'the Government Standard Influenza Medicine'.
The sign on the right says 'Simulants for Patients. Small Bottles of Whisky, Brandy or Stout will be sold at the Central Medicine Depot'. The partly obscured sign at left reads: 'Medicine Supplied Only to Poor People with actual bad cases in the house'.
Read about dispensing alcohol in Wellington
Credit
Alexander Turnbull Library

Reference: 1/1-008542-G

Permission of the Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand, Te Puna Matauranga o Aotearoa, must be obtained before any reuse of this image.




FROM: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/rms-niagara
FROM: http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/media/photo/rms-niagara


Was the Niagara to blame?

Many people believed that a deadly new influenza virus came to New Zealand aboard the Royal Mail liner Niagara, which arrived in Auckland from Vancouver and San Francisco on 12 October 1918. This is now no longer believed to be the case.
Among the ship's passengers were Prime Minister William Massey and his deputy Joseph Ward, who were returning from a war conference. False rumours circulated that Massey had personally rebuffed quarantine measures; in fact, he insisted that he and Ward be treated the same as other passengers. Twenty-nine Niagara crew members and several passengers were hospitalised in Auckland, but doctors reported that their cases were no more severe than others already seen in the city. Indeed, six people had died of the flu in Auckland in the three days before the Niagara arrived. And the great upsurge in severe cases in the city occurred two weeks later, well outside the 48-hour incubation period. Although no one knows exactly how or when the flu reached New Zealand, it is misleading to blame the Niagara, which was only one of dozens of ships (many of them carrying returning soldiers and war invalids) to arrive from Europe and North America in October 1918.






This BELOW has come from the website:
http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&d=MEX19181202.2.19.1&e=-------10--1----0influenza+epidemic--

UNWARY CONVALESCENTS.

Marlborough Express, Volume LII, Issue 294, 2 December 1918, Page 5




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This article has been automatically clipped from the Marlb